Disasters Poised to Sweep Away Development Gains

  • by Stephen Leahy (uxbridge, canada)
  • Tuesday, July 22, 2014
  • Inter Press Service

Last weekend, the United Nations released the 17 draft SDGs following a year and a half of discussion by more than 60 countries participating in the voluntary process.3

The SDGs are a set of goals and targets intended to eliminate extreme poverty and pursue sustainable development. When finalised in 2015, at the expiration of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the SDGs are intended to be the roadmap for countries to follow in making environmental, social and economic policies and decisions.

"Disasters are a major reason many of the MDG goals will not be met," said Harjeet Singh of ActionAid International, an NGO based in Johannesburg.

"A big flood or typhoon can set a region's development back 20 years," Singh, ActionAid's international coordinator of disaster risk reduction, told IPS.

Last year's Super Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 6,000 people and left nearly two million homeless in the Philippines, he said. Less than a year earlier, the Philippines was hit by Typhoon Bopha, which killed more than 1,000 people and caused an estimated 350 million dollars in damage.

In the past two weeks, the country was struck by two destructive typhoons. The Philippines may face another 20 before the end of typhoon season.

"Everything is affected by disasters -- food security, health, education, infrastructure and so on. You can't climb out of poverty if you have to rebuild your home every other year," Singh said.

Goals for poverty elimination or nearly anything else in the proposed SDGs are "meaningless without reductions in carbon emissions", he said.

Carbon emissions from burning oil, coal and gas are trapping heat from the sun. The amount of this extra heat-energy is like exploding 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs per day 365 days per year, according to James Hansen, a climate scientist and former head of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. As a result the entire planet is now 0.8 C hotter.

"All weather events are affected by climate change because the environment in which they occur is warmer and moister than it used to be," Kevin Trenberth, senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado previously told IPS.

Climate change doesn't necessarily cause weather disasters but it certainly makes them worse, said Trenberth, an expert on extreme events.

Climate and low-carbon development pathways need to be fully reflected in the SDGs, said  Bernadette Fischler, co-chair of Beyond 2015 UK. Beyond 2015 is a coalition of more than 1,000 civil society organisations working for a strong and effective set of SDGs.

"Climate change is an urgent issue and needs to be highly visible in the SDGs," Fischler told IPS.

In the current SDG draft climate is goal 13. It calls on countries to "take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts". There is no target to reduce emissions, and nearly all of the targets are about adapting to the coming climate impacts.

"Countries don't want to pre-empt their positions in the U.N. climate change negotiations," said Lina Dabbagh of the Climate Action Network, a global network of environmental NGOs.

The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change ( UNFCCC) involves every country in a negotiation to create a new global climate treaty in 2015. After five years of talks, countries are deadlocked on key issues.

"The SDGs are a huge opportunity to move forward on climate, but the climate goal is weak and there is no action agenda," Dabbagh told IPS.

Finalising the SDGs draft was highly politicised, resulting in very cautious wording. The country alliances and divisions are remarkably similar to those in the UNFCCC negotiations, including the South-North divide, she said.

Every country is concerned about climate change and its impacts but there is wide disagreement on how this should be reflected in the SDGs, with some only wanting a mention in the preamble, said Fischler.

Some countries such as the United Kingdom think 17 goals is too many and it is possible that some will be cut during the final year of negotiations that start once the SDGs are formally introduced at the U.N. General Assembly on Sep. 24.

The day before that the U.N. secretary-general will host a Climate Summit with leaders of many countries in attendance. The summit is intended to kick-start political momentum for an ambitious, global, legal climate treaty in 2015.

"Civil society will make a big push during the summit to make climate an integral part of the SDGs," said Dabbagh.

However, much work remains to help political leaders and the public understand that climate action is the key to eliminating extreme poverty and achieving sustainable development, she said.

© Inter Press Service (2014) — All Rights ReservedOriginal source: Inter Press Service

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