Put People Not ‘Empire of Capital’ at Heart of Development

  • by Ravi Kanth Devarakonda (geneva)
  • Monday, October 27, 2014
  • Inter Press Service

The Raul Prebitsch Lectures, which are named after the first Secretary-General of the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) when it was set up in 1964, allow prominent personalities to speak to a wide audience on burning trade and development topics.

This year, President Correa took the floor on Oct. 24 with a lecture on ‘Ecuador: Development as a Political Process', which covered efforts by his country to build a model of equitable and sustainable development, 3

Development, he told his audience, "is a political process and not a technical equation that can be solved with capital" and he offered a developmental paradigm that seeks to build on "people-oriented" socio-economic and cultural policies to improve the welfare of millions of poor people instead of catering to the "elites of the empire of capital".

Proposing a "new regional financial architecture", he said that "the time has come to pool our resources for establishing a bank and a reserve fund for South American countries to pursue people-oriented developmental policies in our region" and reverse the "elite-based", "capital-dominated", "neoliberal" economic order that has wrought havoc over the past three decades.

"We need to reverse the dollarisation of our economies and stop the transfer of our wealth to finance Treasury bills in the United States," Correa said. "South American economies have transferred over 800 billion dollars to the United States for sustaining U.S. Treasury bills and this is unacceptable."

According to Correa, people-centric policies in the fields of education, health and employment in Ecuador have improved the country's Human Development Index (HDI) since 2007. The HDI is published annually by the U.N. Development Programme (UNDP) is a composite statistic of life expectancy, education and income indices used to rank countries into tiers of human development.

Ecuador's HDI value for 2012 is 0.724 – in the high human development tier – positioning the country at 89 out of 187 countries and territories, according to UNDP's Human Development Report (HDR) for 2013.

Explaining his country's achievement, Correa said that public investments involving the creation of roads, bridges, power grids, telecommunications, water works, educational institutions, hospitals and judiciary have all helped the private sector to reap benefits from overall development.

"At a time when Hooverian depression policies based on austerity measures are continuing to impoverish people while the banks which created the world's worst economic crisis in 2008 are reaping benefits because of the rule of capital,  Ecuador has successfully overcome many hurdles because of its people-oriented policies,"  he said.

Correa argued that by investing public funds in education, which is the "cornerstone of democracy", particularly in higher education or the "Socrates of education", including special education projects for indigenous and Afro-Ecuadorian people, it has been shown that society can put an end to capital-dominated policies.

"We need to change international power relations to overcome neocolonial dependency," Correa told the diplomats present at the lecture.  "Globalisation is the quest for global consumers and it does not serve global citizens."

The Ecuadorian president argued that developing countries have secured a raw deal from the current international trading system which has helped the industrialised nations to pursue imbalanced policies while selectively maintaining barriers.

He urged developing countries to implement autonomous industrialisation strategies, just as the United States had done over two centuries ago.

Developing countries, he said, must pursue "protectionist policies as the United States had implemented under the leadership of Alexander Hamilton when it closed its economy to imports from the United Kingdom."

Citing the research findings of Cambridge-based economist Ha-Joon Chang in his book ‘Bad Samaritans:  The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism', Correa said that protectionist policies are essential for the development of developing countries.

He stressed that developing countries, which are at a comparable of stage of economic development as the United States was in Hamilton's time, must devise policies that would push their economies into the global economic order.

The strategy of "import-substitution-industrialisation " and nascent industry development is needed for developing countries, he said. "However, the developing countries must ensure proper implementation of ISI strategies because governments had committed mistakes in the past while implementing these policies."

"Free trade and unfettered trade," continued Correa, is a "fallacy" based on the Washington Consensus and neoliberal economic policies. In fact, while the United States and other countries preach free trade, they have continued to impose barriers on exports from developing countries.

Turning to the global intellectual property rights regime, which he said is not helpful for the development of all countries, Correa said that these rights must serve the greater public good, suggesting that the current rules do not allow equitable development in the sharing of genetic resources, for example.

In this context, he said that governments must not allow faceless international arbitrators to issue rulings that would severely undermine their "sovereignty" in disputes launched by transnational corporations.

President Correa also called for the free movement of labour on a par with capital. "While capital can move without any controls and cause huge volatility and damage to the international economy, movement of labour is criminalised. This is unacceptable and it is absurd that the movement of labour is met with punitive measures while governments have to welcome capital without any barriers."

He was also severe in his criticism of the financialisation of the global economy which cannot be subjected to the Tobin tax. "Nobel Laureate James Tobin had proposed a tax on financial transactions in 1981 to curb the volatile movement of currencies but it was never implemented because of the power of the financial industry," he argued.

Concluding with a hint that his government's social and economic policies are paving the way for the creation of a healthy society, Correa quipped: "The Pope is an Argentinian, God may be a Brazilian, but ‘Paradise' is in Ecuador."

(Edited by Phil Harris)

© Inter Press Service (2014) — All Rights ReservedOriginal source: Inter Press Service

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