Confusion over U.S. Travel Ban Grounds Foreign Correspondents

  • by Tharanga Yakupitiyage (new york)
  • Monday, February 20, 2017
  • Inter Press Service

Confusion over the implementation of the US travel ban has left journalists unable to travel. Credit: Rebecca Murray/IPS.

U.S. President Donald Trump's immigration executive order sent shockwaves throughout the world as citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries and all refugees were barred from entering the country for 90 days and 120 days respectively.

Though the travel ban is temporarily on hold following a court decision to reject its reinstatement, President Trump stood by his policy, calling it "common sense" and promising to keep "the wrong people" out of the U.S. Trump announced Thursday that he would sign a new Executive Order next week which will address some of the legal issues raised by the U.S. courts.

Within the millions affected by the travel ban are journalists, many of whom were caught amidst the chaos and confusion as the initial Executive Order was implemented.

In the wake of the order, BBC journalist Ali Hamedani, an Iranian-born British citizen, was detained and questioned upon his arrival at Chicago's O'Hare airport for over two hours.

He said his phone and computer were searched, including his social media accounts.

"It wasn't pleasant at all. To be honest with you, I was arrested back home in Iran in 2009 because I was working for the BBC and I felt the same this time," he said.

Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian, a dual American and Iranian citizen, also expressed his fear about the "major" impact of the new policy on his family, stating: "This isn't the America I promised when we were finally set free."

Rezaian spent nearly two years in an Iranian prison after being arrested on charges including espionage and propaganda against the government.

CNN editor and award-winning journalist Mohammed Tawfeeq, who is an Iraqi national and legal permanent resident of the U.S., was detained in Atlanta where he was subjected to additional screening. He promptly filed a federal lawsuit challenging the executive order.

"We are concerned when policies adopted by countries restrict the access and movement of journalists…We believe that journalists should be allowed to enter countries, to report on them regardless of where those countries are," Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ)'s Advocacy Director Courtney Radsch told IPS.

The ban also affects foreign correspondents covering the United Nations. Although there is a specific exception for journalists traveling as part of diplomatic delegations to the United Nations, the original executive order does not directly address any other media visas given to foreign media representatives traveling to or who are already in the country.

The restrictions have also concerned journalist Sama Dizayee, an Iraqi journalist who is a green card holding legal permanent resident in the U.S.

Dizayee told IPS that she had a trip planned to London but was forced to cancel it once the travel ban was implemented.

"I wake up and all of these people that were detained, deported back to their home countries…I was like oh my god I'm a legal resident here in America and I came all the way from Iraq here to pursue journalism, a dream that I always wanted and now my freedom is threatened," she told IPS.

The Department of Homeland Security later clarified the policy in relation to green card holders, stating that U.S. permanent residents from one of the seven countries are not automatically barred from entry and will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Despite this, Dizayee, who initially had refugee status before becoming a permanent resident, said she still did not want to take the risk.

"Do I really want to become subject to extra screening and hours of being held at the airport? Do I really want to be profiled as a Muslim Iraqi here in the U.S.? This is not an experience I want to remember," she said.

Dizayee told IPS that she has always been subjected to extra screening due to her background, waiting for hours to be released.

"That really stays with you…and it has now become a law with this travel ban," she said.

Dizayee highlighted that the stakes are particularly high for journalists whose work is now limited due to the inability to travel.

" go places to cover stories—they go to Iraq, to Lebanon, we travel all the time," she said, adding that she had planned to travel to Iraq to cover the Mosul battle.

"I can't be there now, I can't write that story," Dizayee continued.

CPJ issued a safety advisory for journalists, recommending that those who are from one of the seven countries with media visas in the U.S. should not leave within the time period covered by the executive order.

Radsch also advised journalists not to travel with mobile or other devices or to make sure confidential or important information is backed up rather than on their devices.

"This order is helping to highlight the importance of for journalists," she told IPS.

The U.S. order has already emboldened other governments to implement similar policies, including the Iraqi government which approved a "reciprocity" measure banning Americans from entering the Middle Eastern country, further restricting information flow across borders and journalists' ability to report.

Radsch highlighted the need to get clarity on how the order is impacting journalists and what the regulations are.

She also told IPS that journalists have been subject to secondary screening and questioning at the border before this new policy, including Canadian photojournalist Ed Ou who was pulled aside and interrogated for six hours on his way to cover the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. After refusing to surrender the password to his devices, Ed Ou was denied entry into the U.S.

Dizayee expressed uncertainty and apprehension regarding the future of the new travel restrictions.

"I was always dreaming to live here, to write stories here, to be able to travel to places and write whatever I wanted to write about without being persecuted," she told IPS.

"I am not going anywhere for the next 90 days for sure," Dizayee continued.

The immigration executive order, initially implemented at the end of January, was denounced by several human rights groups and politicians, including the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights who said: "Discrimination on nationality alone is forbidden under human rights law. The US ban is also mean spirited, and wastes resources needed for proper counter-terrorism."

Similarly, Iran's foreign minister, Javad Sarif, said the Trump Administration's decision would be recorded in history as "a great gift to extremists and their supporters" while Swedish foreign affairs minister Margot Wallström said she was "deeply concerned" by a decision that "creates mistrust between people."

Others expressed support for the move including Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull who stated that ""it is vital that every nation is able to control who comes across its borders."

© Inter Press Service (2017) — All Rights ReservedOriginal source: Inter Press Service

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