COP19—Warsaw Climate Conference

Author and Page information

  • by Anup Shah
  • This Page Created Monday, December 02, 2013

On this page:

  1. Introduction
  2. Meeting outcome
  3. In context: common but differentiated responsibilities
  4. In context: Typhoon Haiyan
  5. Lack of urgency
  6. More information
  7. News stories from IPS

Introduction

November 11 – 23, 2013, Warsaw, Poland was the venue for the 19th annual United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as the 19th Conference of the Parties — or COP 19.

The purpose of this conference was to create a loss and damage pillar of a new climate treaty to be finalized in 2015. The other two pillars discussed in previous meetings are mitigation (emission reductions) and adaptation pillars.

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Meeting outcome

The main outcome of the meeting was the establishment of an international mechanism for a loss and damage associated with climate change impacts1.

Predictably, the loss and damage aspect of climate negotiations brought out the worst in some countries. Some developing countries were going to resist the idea of financing adaptation to climate change 2, while others appeared to hate the idea of climate reparations for poor countries. A few years earlier, industrialized nations had made a legal commitment to a global climate fund. Unsurprisingly, not much came of it, as Inter Press Service summarized,

In 2009 at the semi-infamous Copenhagen talks, the rich countries made a deal with developing countries, saying in effect: We’ll give you billions of dollars for adaptation, ramping up to 100 billion dollars a year by 2020, in exchange for our mitigation amounting to small CO2 cuts instead of making the big cuts that we should do.

The money to help poor countries adapt flowed for the first three years but has largely dried up. Warsaw was supposed to be the Finance COP to bring the promised money. That didn't happen.

Countries like Germany, Switzerland and others in Europe only managed to scrape together promises of 110 million dollars into the Green Climate Fund. Developing countries wanted a guarantee of 70 billion a year by 2016 but were blocked by the U.S., Canada, Australia, Japan and others.

Stephen Lehey, South Scores 11th-Hour Win on Climate Loss and Damage 3, Inter Press Service, November 24, 2013

It got to the point that hundreds of representatives from various NGOs walked out of the negotiating rooms 4 to protest against developed countries’ reluctance to commit to a loss and damage mechanism. And this was a day after the G77+China group of 133 developing countries walked out of negotiations over the same thing.

Looking through the briefing reports5 from the respected NGO, the Third World Network, It seems that on the surface, while an outcome was eventually thrashed out, there are many areas of weakness of sufficient vagueness to satisfy everyone that contentious issues that are seemingly resolved can still be challenged and changed in the future.

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In context: common but differentiated responsibilities

Many years ago all nations agreed that climate change was largely the result of actions from today’s industrialized nations, as carbon dioxide — the main greenhouse gas — stays in the atmosphere for decades. Yet, the poorest would end up suffering the most for a problem they largely did not cause. The approaches to mitigation (emissions reduction) would therefore be different for those groups of countries — the common but differentiated responsibilities principle.

It is in this context that the discussion for loss and damage has come about. And it is something that rich countries are keen to get rid of6.

The years of resistance on this issue (and many others) means each time it is discussed again the reactions seem to get even more hostile. Combined with the lack of detailed context in the mainstream media coverage of this aspect, it then becomes easier each time to see culprits as China and India given their enormous greenhouse emissions in recent years, compared to the far greater amount by the industrialized nations over the longer period. See this site’s section on climate justice7 for more detailed background.

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In context: Typhoon Haiyan

Typhoon Haiyan was the largest cyclone on record to hit land

The meeting came at the time when the devastating Typhoon Haiyan had just killed thousands in the Philippines and affected millions more. It was an ominous warning of what could be more frequent as climate change continues to take hold.

It was also an example of how poorer nations could be affected by a problem they have largely not been responsible for and that while all the international outpouring of aid and assistance was incredibly welcome, that support for preventing and adapting to such events is paramount and efforts are urgently needed to curb emission increases.

In an emotional speech the Philippines lead negotiator for the conference, Naderev Saño, received a standing ovation for announcing that he will go on a hunger strike until a meaningful outcome is in sight.

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Lack of urgency

Inter Press Service (IPS) noted the seeming lack of urgency given the years and years of delay and watering down of meaningful action:

To have a good chance at staying under two degrees C, industrialised countries need to crash their CO2 emissions 10 percent per year starting in 2014, said Kevin Anderson of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of Manchester.

We can still do two C but not the way we're going, Anderson said on the sidelines of COP 19 in Warsaw. He wondered why negotiators on the inside are not reacting to the reality that it is too late for incremental changes.

I’m really stunned there is no sense of urgency here, he told IPS.

Stephen Lehey, South Scores 11th-Hour Win on Climate Loss and Damage 8, Inter Press Service, November 24, 2013

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More information

As the conference is still underway as this page is written, more information will be added here after the event is over.

For more about the issues from other organizations, here are some starting points:

  • Official United Nations section on COP199
  • Official COP 19 website10
  • Updates from the Third World Network11
  • Coverage from Democracy Now!12 including useful news videos

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News stories from IPS

Below is a list of stories from Inter Press Service related to the Warsaw climate conference and its aftermath.

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    Where next?

    Related articles

    1. Climate Change and Global Warming Introduction
    2. UN Framework Convention on Climate Change
    3. Reactions to Climate Change Negotiations and Action
    4. Action on climate change is cheaper than inaction
    5. Global Warming, Spin and Media
    6. Climate Justice and Equity
    7. Climate Change Flexibility Mechanisms
    8. Carbon Sinks, Forests and Climate Change
    9. Climate Change Affects Biodiversity
    10. Global Warming and Population

    Online Sources:

    (Note that listed here are only those hyperlinks to other articles from other web sites or elsewhere on this web site. Other sources such as journal, books and magazines, are mentioned above in the original text. Please also note that links to external sites are beyond my control. They might become unavailable temporarily or permanently since you read this, depending on the policies of those sites, which I cannot unfortunately do anything about.)

    1. Zhenyan Zhu, 'COP 19 establishes Warsaw international mechanism for loss and damage', Third World Network, 27 November 2013, http://twn.my/title2/climate/news/warsaw01/TWN_update25.pdf
    2. 'Leaked Memo Reveals U.S. Plan to Oppose Helping Poor Nations Adapt to Climate Change', Democracy Now!, November 19, 2013, http://www.democracynow.org/2013/11/19/leaked_memo_reveals_us_plan_to
    3. http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/11/south-scores-11th-hour-win-on-climate-loss-and-damage
    4. Wambi Michael, 'Storm Brews at U.N. Climate Talks', Inter Press Service, November 21, 2013, http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/11/storm-brews-at-u-n-climate-talks
    5. http://twn.my/title2/climate/warsaw01up.htm
    6. Meena Raman, 'Fight over developed-developing country differentiation in 2015 ‘agreement’, Third World Network, November 26, 2013, http://twn.my/title2/climate/news/warsaw01/TWN_update24.pdf
    7. Global Issues: “Climate Justice and Equity”, Last updated: Sunday, January 08, 2012, http://www.globalissues.org/article/231/climate-justice-and-equity
    8. http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/11/south-scores-11th-hour-win-on-climate-loss-and-damage
    9. http://unfccc.int/meetings/warsaw_nov_2013/meeting/7649.php
    10. http://www.cop19.gov.pl/
    11. http://twn.my/title2/climate/warsaw01up.htm
    12. http://www.democracynow.org/topics/warsaw_climate_summit_2013

    Author and Page Information

    • by Anup Shah
    • Created: Monday, December 02, 2013

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