What’s New April 2001

This page lists recent changes made to this site such as new pages, or updates to existing sections. The "Find Out More" links will take you to the changes. If this jumps to the middle of a page, you can easily scroll up to understand the context of the new information a bit further.

Date of Update

Description


April 19, 2001


  1. Is the planet facing problems more from the way the population numbers are rising or from the way that some consume resources? While there is a bit of both, it is more about how some in wealthier nations consume resources far more than those with large populations, and promote such economic policies around the world. Of course, if those countries with large populations follow the economic development path that the current wealthy ones have, then the planet is likely not going to be able to cope! So do we more effectively tackle this issue by methods of population "control" (which risks leaving underlying policies that misuse our resources in tact, and blames largely the poor, who are victims of these policies in the first place) or do we approach this issue by addressing our economic policies, consumption habits, sustainable use of resources, etc.? A number of sections on the population part of the global issues web site have been updated, with facts and figures and more on some frameworks used to explain population growth as a problem. More is added also to introduce how land is used, resources are consumed etc. and how that would tie in with population reduction strategies.
    Find Out More about Population Numbers »
    Find Out More about Consumption and Resource Usage »
    - Related Section(s): Human Population / Environment Related Issues / Trade Related Issues / Causes of Poverty


  2. Additional information on the Free Trade of the Americas (FTAA) has been added. The FTAA, which would cover all of the Americas apart from Cuba, would be like an extension of NAFTA, and hence has drawn much concern and criticism from concern from many people. As with NAFTA there is concern that the FTAA will result in more rights for corporate interests, without appropriate accountability, thereby being a detriment to most people in the region. Journalists and others are raising concerns about the secrecy surrounding the agreements, while others are afraid of violence on peaceful protestors by the heavy police presence expected. Find Out More »
    - Related Section(s): Free Trade and Globalization / Trade Related Issues



April 4, 2001


  1. U.S. President George Bush basically rejected the Kyoto protocol on climate change. As well as economic fears and certain business lobby pressures, he cited how countries like India and China would be exempt. He ignored how on a per capita basis, their greenhouse emissions are far less than the United States and other countries. It is widely agreed, and part of the underlying United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), upon which the Kyoto Protocol was based, that Southern countries have not been the major polluters and should not be subject to the cutbacks as the Industrialized nations, but should, nevertheless look to alternative solutions going forward. The Kyoto Protocol was discussed in 1997 in Kyoto, Japan and subsequent conferences have taken place. However, politics and economic interests have resulted in a lack of effective progress to tackle climate change. Various links have been added to the Kyoto section on this web site. Find Out More »
    - Related Section(s): Global Warming / Environment Related Issues / Trade Related Issues


  2. Some additional information on the Free Trade of the Americas (FTAA) has been added. The FTAA, which would cover all of the Americas apart from Cuba, would be like an extension of NAFTA, and hence has drawn much concern and criticism from concern from many people. As with NAFTA there is concern that the FTAA will result in more rights for corporate interests, without appropriate accountability, thereby being a detriment to most people in the region. Find Out More »
    - Related Section(s): Free Trade and Globalization / Trade Related Issues


  3. Some additional information on the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been added. Information includes additional links and reports from Human Rights Watch, Oxfam and others. The conflict in the DRC has involved over seven nations directly, and has many interests at stake including the rich minerals and resources. Over a million people are said to have been killed in just 1999 and 2000 alone, according to Oxfam. International attention is limited compared to other conflicts that have been less brutal. Find Out More »
    - Related Section(s): Conflicts in Africa / Geopolitics


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