What’s New April 2006

This page lists changes to this site for April 2006.

See below for other updates and to get notified of changes to the site.

The permanent link for this update is:

While probably not a new claim, a documentary in the UK some weeks ago showed how Tony Blair, the police, and even parts of the media have all contributed to fabrications, spin, and lies in the war on terror. For example, there was no Ricin discovered in the so-called Ricin plot—although it was used by the British government and raised as part of the US presentation in February 2003 at the UN Security Council to justify war on Iraq. A plot to blow up Manchester United’s football (soccer) stadium was fabricated. Tony Blair has asked for many rushed policies some of which have not even been necessary, to fight the war on terror. All in all, a lot of deceit has led to a reduction in public trust of government, police, media, and intelligence services.

Energy security issues cut across a number of global issues, such as environmental issues, geopolitics, development, economics and more. A new section has been started on this issue, as many people have been asking for it. Unfortunately due to time constraints at the moment, it is quite short, but over time I hope to grow it.

Related Issue:

India’s new patent laws bring them in line with the restrictive WTO laws, making it harder to produce generic drugs, which are cheaper and often life-saving. Furthermore, with India’s highly skilled, though cheaper labor force, pharmaceutical companies see it profitable to do testing there on the poorer people. However, those drugs are not usually for them, but instead for the markets of industrialized nations.

You can also

Get notified when there are new updates

GlobalIssues.org provides various ways you can be notified when there is new content:

  1. Sign up for free email updates
  2. Try the Web Feed
  3. Follow globalissues.org on or

Tip: how to to highlight updated parts of pages

Most updates are made to existing pages. This is how you can quickly view them:

  1. If you have a modern browser, look for the Last Updated date text near the top of the article.
  2. If the text is underlined, you can select it.
  3. This will bring up a list of dates when the page was updated. (Note only dates since the beginning of 2004, when this new feature was created, will show up.)
  4. When you select a date, the text that was updated on that date will be highlighted.
  5. As you scroll down the page, you will see those highlighted sections.