News headlines for “Climate Change and Global Warming”, page 3

  1. Science & Policy Must Remain Partners in Mercury Challenge

    Monday, November 25, 2019

    GENEVA, Nov 25 (IPS) - Minamata COP3 provides chance to get effectiveness evaluation right. It has been more than two years since the Minamata Convention on Mercury entered into force. The global treaty protects humans and the environment from the toxic metal, but countries are still stuck on how to measure the agreement's effectiveness.

  2. A 650 Million Dollar Pledge Aimed at Eradicating Extreme Hunger by 2030

    Friday, November 22, 2019

    UNITED NATIONS, Nov 22 (IPS) - When a coalition of international donors pledged more than $650 million to provide assistance to over 300 million smallholder farmers in developing countries, the primary aim was to help increase agricultural and livestock production besieged by droughts, floods and other natural disasters triggered by climate change-- mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

  3. Green Steel

    Thursday, November 21, 2019

    BEIJING, China, Nov 21 (IPS) - How Indonesian craftsmanship is undergoing a revival at the world's first ‘bamboo university'.

    It's fast-growing, flexible and strong. Standing underneath a bamboo canopy, it is easy to understand why people have been using this grass plant for years, in the construction of houses, bridges and scaffolding.

  4. More Than just a Toilet: Fusing innovation & Partnerships for a Better World

    Thursday, November 21, 2019

    KOHLER, Wisconsin, Nov 21 (IPS) - Each year, World Toilet Day* raises awareness of the crucial role that sanitation plays in reducing disease and creating healthier communities.

    At Kohler, we're committed to finding solutions for universal sanitation access by leveraging our design & innovation competencies and partnering with like-minded organizations to bring meaningful innovations to those communities most in need.

  5. Winning the ‘No Food Loss’ Battle: The Case of Japan

    Wednesday, November 20, 2019

    ARKANSAS, Nov 20 (IPS) - Humankind since almost the time that there is recorded history has grappled with the question of ‘how many is too many?' The response is expectedly complex as it varies across time and space. The pace of population growth was slow till about approximately 250 years or so. It is only since the middle of the eighteenth century that there has been a palpable acceleration in population growth.

  6. Seeing Through the Smog: Can New Delhi Find a Way to Limit Air Pollution?

    Tuesday, November 19, 2019

    NEW DELHI, Nov 19 (IPS) - Ankita Gupta, a housewife from south Delhi, is anxious about whether she should send her 4-year-old daughter to kindergarten. Outside visibility is poor as smog — a combination of emissions from factories, vehicle exhausts, coal plants and chemicals reacting with sunlight — has settled over the city, surpassing dangerous levels.

  7. Climate Change and Loss of Species: Our Greatest Challenges

    Tuesday, November 19, 2019

    ROME, Nov 19 (IPS) - Mottled and reddish, the Lake Oku puddle frog has made its tragic debut on the Red Lista rapidly expanding roll call of threatened species. It was once abundant in the Kilum-Ijim rainforest of Cameroon but has not been seen since 2010 and is now listed as critically endangered and possibly extinct.

  8. The Ocean in Us: Ocean Action for Climate Ambition

    Monday, November 18, 2019

    NOUMEA, New Caledonia, Nov 18 (IPS) - In just under a month, countries around the world will gather for UNFCCC COP 25. The hashtag for this year's "Blue COP" is yet another reminder to us all that it is "Time For Action". We can no longer afford to wait as the effects of the climate crisis become ever more present. Vulnerable populations, whether from Small Island States, the rural heartland or the world's megacities, are becoming ever more vulnerable, and the wellbeing of people and planet continues to face its most existential threat.

  9. The Global Economy of Pulses: Impressive Gains and the Way Forward

    Thursday, November 14, 2019

    ROME, Nov 14 (IPS) - Pulses are highly nutritious and their consumption is associated with many health benefits. They are rich in proteins and minerals, high in fibre and have a low fat content. Pulses are produced by plants of the Leguminosae family.

    These plants have root nodules that absorb inert nitrogen from soil air and convert it into biologically useful ammonia, a process referred to as biological nitrogen fixation.

    Consequently, the pulse crops do not need any additional nitrogen as fertilizer and help reduce the requirement of fossil fuel-based chemical nitrogen fertilization for other crops.

    Expansion of pulse production, therefore, can play a vital role in mitigating the effects of climate change.

  10. Will Artificial Intelligence Help Resolve the Food Crisis?

    Thursday, November 14, 2019

    UNITED NATIONS, Nov 14 (IPS) - When UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres made a global appeal for "zero hunger" on World Food Day last month, he provided some grim statistics rich in irony: more than 820 million people do not have enough to eat, he said, while two billion people are overweight or obese.

Web feed for Climate Change and Global Warming news headlines