Today, around 21,000 children died around the world. This daily tragedy, from poverty and other preventable causes, rarely makes headline news.

Latest World News

World

  1. Ethiopian Domestic Workers Battle for Survival in Saudi Arabia

    Friday, September 21, 2018

    JEDDAH, Saudi Arabia, Sep 21 (IPS) - Marjani F, 44, spent 8 years in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia's capital working as domestic help. "My husband was killed by the military after being accused of organizing a protest. I have four children and there was no way I could pay the bills staying there," she says.

  2. Experts Call For Global Momentum on Gender Parity

    Friday, September 21, 2018

    NAIROBI, Sep 21 (IPS) - The world's most important meeting is underway in New York, providing yet another opportunity for world leaders to discuss a wide array of issues such as peace, security and sustainable development. And experts stress that the role of women in peace, security and sustainable development cannot be over-emphasised.

  3. Recognising the Debilitating Nature Conflict Has on Food Security

    Friday, September 21, 2018

    BULAWAYO, Zimbabwe, Sep 21 (IPS) - Nyalen Kuong and her daughters fled to safety after an attack on their village in South Sudan in which Kuong's husband and two sons where killed and the family's cattle lost. Kuong, her daughters and other families from their village fled to islands surrounded by swamp land. There, she had little to eat. And soon began suffering from diarrhoea, brought on by acute malnutrition.

  4. Freezing Inside UAE’s High Rise Buildings While Temperatures Soar Outside

    Thursday, September 20, 2018

    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates, Sep 20 (IPS) - "Look at these tall, beautiful buildings. I have worked as a mason during the construction and was one of those who laid brick by brick," says Mohammed Akhtar* who has been working as mason for over a decade in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    Akhtar has seen the evolution of Dubai's skyline over time. "It has been an overwhelming journey."  When asked what has changed in the last 10 years, Akhtar smiles and says the weather.

  5. First Steps Towards a Global Agreement on the High Seas

    Thursday, September 20, 2018

    LONDON, Sep 20 (IPS) - Andrew Norton is director, International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)The world's first efforts to develop a way to govern the high seas – international waters beyond the 200 nautical mile national boundary – is truly underway. The initial round of negotiations at the United Nations has just ended after two weeks of talks.

  6. Indigenous Peoples Link Their Development to Clean Energies

    Thursday, September 20, 2018

    SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Sep 20 (IPS) - Achuar indigenous communities in Ecuador are turning to the sun to generate electricity for their homes and transport themselves in canoes with solar panels along the rivers of their territory in the Amazon rainforest, just one illustration of how indigenous people are seeking clean energies as a partner for sustainable development.

  7. Levelling the Playing Field for Persons with Disabilities Individuals in the United States

    Wednesday, September 19, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Sep 19 (IPS) - This article is part of a series of stories on disability inclusion.When it was time for Joe Lupinacci to graduate from his high school in Stamford, Connecticut, he knew he wanted to go to college. While other students were deciding which college to apply to, the choice required more thought and research on Lupinacci and his parents' part. Lupinacci, who has Down Syndrome, needed a college that would meet his needs.

  8. UN Expects More Upheavals as Trump’s Foreign Policy Runs Wild

    Wednesday, September 19, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Sep 19 (IPS) - The unpredictable Donald Trump, described by some as a human wrecking ball, will be walking down his own path of self-inflicted destruction when he visits the United Nations next week.

  9. The Cambodian Port City on China’s 21st Century Silk Road That’s Becoming the New Macau

    Wednesday, September 19, 2018

    SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia, Sep 19 (IPS) - Kris Janssens is a Belgian reporter based in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. His goal is to tell extraordinary stories about ordinary people throughout Southeast Asia.The new Macau. That's what the Cambodian coastal city Sihanoukville is called nowadays. Chinese investors are building casinos there on a massive scale.

    The southern port city lies on the new Silk Road (the so called 'One Belt, One Road') and is therefore interesting for China.

    The Cambodian government is happy to accept the money. And Beijing never asks difficult questions.

  10. An Urgent Need to Turn Down Rhetoric Against Migrants & Refugees

    Tuesday, September 18, 2018

    LONDON, Sep 18 (IPS) - Carl Soderbergh is Director of Policy & Communications, Minority Rights Group InternationalMigration has become a focus of debate in recent years. From United States President Donald Trump's vehemently anti-migrant and anti-Muslim rhetoric to Denmark's new ‘ghetto laws', the language has become increasingly heated.

  11. More stories…

Economy

  1. Ethiopian Domestic Workers Battle for Survival in Saudi Arabia

    Friday, September 21, 2018

    JEDDAH, Saudi Arabia, Sep 21 (IPS) - Marjani F, 44, spent 8 years in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia's capital working as domestic help. "My husband was killed by the military after being accused of organizing a protest. I have four children and there was no way I could pay the bills staying there," she says.

  2. Freezing Inside UAE’s High Rise Buildings While Temperatures Soar Outside

    Thursday, September 20, 2018

    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates, Sep 20 (IPS) - "Look at these tall, beautiful buildings. I have worked as a mason during the construction and was one of those who laid brick by brick," says Mohammed Akhtar* who has been working as mason for over a decade in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    Akhtar has seen the evolution of Dubai's skyline over time. "It has been an overwhelming journey."  When asked what has changed in the last 10 years, Akhtar smiles and says the weather.

  3. First Steps Towards a Global Agreement on the High Seas

    Thursday, September 20, 2018

    LONDON, Sep 20 (IPS) - Andrew Norton is director, International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)The world's first efforts to develop a way to govern the high seas – international waters beyond the 200 nautical mile national boundary – is truly underway. The initial round of negotiations at the United Nations has just ended after two weeks of talks.

  4. The Cambodian Port City on China’s 21st Century Silk Road That’s Becoming the New Macau

    Wednesday, September 19, 2018

    SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia, Sep 19 (IPS) - Kris Janssens is a Belgian reporter based in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. His goal is to tell extraordinary stories about ordinary people throughout Southeast Asia.The new Macau. That's what the Cambodian coastal city Sihanoukville is called nowadays. Chinese investors are building casinos there on a massive scale.

    The southern port city lies on the new Silk Road (the so called 'One Belt, One Road') and is therefore interesting for China.

    The Cambodian government is happy to accept the money. And Beijing never asks difficult questions.

  5. Another global financial crisis for developing countries?

    Tuesday, September 18, 2018

    SYDNEY & KUALA LUMPUR, Sep 18 (IPS) - George Soros, Bill Gates and other pundits have been predicting another financial crisis. In their recent book, Revolution Required: The Ticking Bombs of the G7 ModelPeter Dittus and Herve Hamoun, former senior officials of the Bank of International Settlements, warned of ‘ticking time bombs' in the global financial system waiting to explode, mainly due to the policies of major developed countries.

  6. Crisis Drives Nicaragua to an Economic and Social Precipice

    Monday, September 17, 2018

    MANAGUA, Sep 17 (IPS) - Five months after the outbreak of mass protests in Nicaragua, in addition to the more than 300 deaths, the crisis has had visible consequences in terms of increased poverty and migration, as well as the international isolation of the government and a wave of repression that continues unabated.

  7. The Causes Behind Africa's Digital Gender Divide

    Friday, September 14, 2018

    MAPUTO, Sep 14 (IPS) - Systemic inequalities based on gender, race, income and geography are mirrored in the digital realm and leave many women, especially the poor and the rural, trailing behind Africa's tech transformation.

  8. South-South Cooperation in a Transformative Era

    Thursday, September 13, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Sep 13 (IPS) - Jorge Chediek is Director, UN Office of South-South Cooperation (UNOSSC) and Envoy of the Secretary-General on South-South Cooperation.On 12 September, the international community commemorated the UN Day for South-South Cooperation. This is an important acknowledgement of the contributions of Southern partnerships in addressing the many development challenges that confront the international community, such as poverty, climate change, inequality, contagious diseases and humanitarian crises.

  9. Q&A: Achieving Sustainable Goals: “In the End it is All About People. If People Want, it Will Happen.”

    Wednesday, September 12, 2018

    STOCKHOLM, Sep 12 (IPS) - Manipadma Jena interviews the Deputy Director and Water Sector Lead at the Global Green Growth Institute's (GGGI) Investment and Policy Solutions Division, PETER VOS.Today just over two billion people live without readily available, safe water supplies at home. And more than half the world's population, roughly 4.3 billion people, live in areas where demand for water resources outstrips sustainable supplies for at least part of the year.

  10. “Running Out Of Time” - Local Communities Mobilise for the Climate

    Wednesday, September 12, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Sep 12 (IPS) - Local communities across the globe have risen up to demand commitments on climate change, as frustration mounts over the lack of action.

  11. More stories…

Climate

  1. Freezing Inside UAE’s High Rise Buildings While Temperatures Soar Outside

    Thursday, September 20, 2018

    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates, Sep 20 (IPS) - "Look at these tall, beautiful buildings. I have worked as a mason during the construction and was one of those who laid brick by brick," says Mohammed Akhtar* who has been working as mason for over a decade in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    Akhtar has seen the evolution of Dubai's skyline over time. "It has been an overwhelming journey."  When asked what has changed in the last 10 years, Akhtar smiles and says the weather.

  2. First Steps Towards a Global Agreement on the High Seas

    Thursday, September 20, 2018

    LONDON, Sep 20 (IPS) - Andrew Norton is director, International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)The world's first efforts to develop a way to govern the high seas – international waters beyond the 200 nautical mile national boundary – is truly underway. The initial round of negotiations at the United Nations has just ended after two weeks of talks.

  3. Indigenous Peoples Link Their Development to Clean Energies

    Thursday, September 20, 2018

    SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Sep 20 (IPS) - Achuar indigenous communities in Ecuador are turning to the sun to generate electricity for their homes and transport themselves in canoes with solar panels along the rivers of their territory in the Amazon rainforest, just one illustration of how indigenous people are seeking clean energies as a partner for sustainable development.

  4. Between Drought and Floods, Cuba Seeks to Improve Water Management

    Saturday, September 15, 2018

    HAVANA, Sep 15 (IPS) - If you enjoy a good daily shower and water comes out every time you turn on the taps in your home, you should feel privileged. There are places in the world where this vital resource for life is becoming scarcer by the day and the forecasts for the future are grim.

  5. Worldwide Effects of Asbestos Use

    Friday, September 14, 2018

    WALLINGFORD, CT, US, Sep 14 (IPS) - Emily Walsh is the Community Outreach Director with the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance.

    Earlier this summer, the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States (EPA) issued a Significant New Use Rule (SNUR) on asbestos, a naturally occurring mineral that is also a known carcinogen. Asbestos is the only definitive cause of mesothelioma, a cancer which affects the linings of internal organs.

  6. Preservation of the Klamath River - a Life or Death Matter for the Yurok People

    Thursday, September 13, 2018

    KLAMATH, California, USA, Sep 13 (IPS) - Fishermen are scarce in the Klamath River delta, unlike other fishing season, because climate change has driven up water temperatures which kills off the salmon, the flagship species of this region in northern California.

  7. Global Warming Threatens Europe's Public Health

    Thursday, September 13, 2018

    VIENNA, Sep 13 (IPS) - Climate change and health experts are warning of the growing threat to public health in Europe from global warming as rising temperatures help potentially lethal diseases spread easily across the continent.

  8. Q&A: Achieving Sustainable Goals: “In the End it is All About People. If People Want, it Will Happen.”

    Wednesday, September 12, 2018

    STOCKHOLM, Sep 12 (IPS) - Manipadma Jena interviews the Deputy Director and Water Sector Lead at the Global Green Growth Institute's (GGGI) Investment and Policy Solutions Division, PETER VOS.Today just over two billion people live without readily available, safe water supplies at home. And more than half the world's population, roughly 4.3 billion people, live in areas where demand for water resources outstrips sustainable supplies for at least part of the year.

  9. “Running Out Of Time” - Local Communities Mobilise for the Climate

    Wednesday, September 12, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Sep 12 (IPS) - Local communities across the globe have risen up to demand commitments on climate change, as frustration mounts over the lack of action.

  10. Q&A: As Water Scarcity Becomes the New Normal How Do We Manage This Scarce Resource?

    Tuesday, September 11, 2018

    STOCKHOLM, Sep 11 (IPS) - Manipadma Jena interviews the executive director of the Stockholm International Water Institute, Torgyn Holmgren.

    Growing economies are thirsty economies. And water scarcity has become "the new normal" in many parts of the world, according to Torgyn Holmgren, executive director of the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI).

  11. More stories…

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Issues In depth

Latest

Action on climate change is cheaper than inaction

Posted Monday, February 02, 2015.

Many are afraid that tackling climate change is going to be too costly. But increasingly, studies are showing action will not just be cheaper than inaction, but could actually result in economic, environmental and even health benefits, while improving sustainability.

Read “Action on climate change is cheaper than inaction” to learn more.

Climate Change and Global Warming Introduction

Last updated Sunday, February 01, 2015.

The climate is changing. The earth is warming up, and there is now overwhelming scientific consensus that it is happening, and human-induced. With global warming on the increase and species and their habitats on the decrease, chances for ecosystems to adapt naturally are diminishing.

Many are agreed that climate change may be one of the greatest threats facing the planet. Recent years show increasing temperatures in various regions, and/or increasing extremities in weather patterns.

This section looks at what causes climate change, what the impacts are and where scientific consensus currently is.

Read “Climate Change and Global Warming Introduction” to learn more.

COP20—Lima Climate Conference

Posted Saturday, January 24, 2015.

An overview of the Climate Change Conference (also known as COP 20), held in Lima, Peru in December 2014.

While it seemed like it was a successful meeting, because developing nations were committed to drawing up their own plans for emissions reductions for the first time, a number of important issues were left undecided such as how financing would work.

This page is an overview of the Lima Climate conference.

Read “COP20—Lima Climate Conference” to learn more.

Ebola Outbreak in West Africa

Posted Saturday, September 27, 2014.

An overview of the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa that has been described by the World Health Organization as the largest, most severe and most complex outbreak in the history of the disease.

The epidemic began at the end of 2013, in Guinea. From there it spread to Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Senegal. Many of the affected countries face enormous challenges in stopping its spread and providing care for all patients.

Thousands of people have died and many are at risk as the fatality rate from this virus is very high. As the crisis worsens, as well as the enormous health challenges involved, the social and economic consequences may set these countries back, reversing some gains a number of these countries have made in recent years.

Read “Ebola Outbreak in West Africa” to learn more.

Foreign Aid for Development Assistance

Last updated Sunday, September 28, 2014.

In 1970, the world’s rich countries agreed to give 0.7% of their gross national income as official international development aid, annually.

Since that time, billions have certainly been given each year, but rarely have the rich nations actually met their promised target.

For example, the US is often the largest donor in dollar terms, but ranks amongst the lowest in terms of meeting the stated 0.7% target.

Net ODA in dollars and percent of GNI

Furthermore, aid has often come with a price of its own for the developing nations. Common criticisms, for many years, of foreign aid, have included the following:

  • Aid is often wasted on conditions that the recipient must use overpriced goods and services from donor countries
  • Most aid does not actually go to the poorest who would need it the most
  • Aid amounts are dwarfed by rich country protectionism that denies market access for poor country products while rich nations use aid as a lever to open poor country markets to their products
  • Large projects or massive grand strategies often fail to help the vulnerable; money can often be embezzled away.

This article explores who has benefited most from this aid, the recipients or the donors.

Read “Foreign Aid for Development Assistance” to learn more.

Nature and Animal Conservation

Last updated Sunday, January 19, 2014.

Preserving species and their habitats is important for ecosystems to self-sustain themselves.

Yet, the pressures to destroy habitat for logging, illegal hunting, and other challenges are making conservation a struggle.

Read “Nature and Animal Conservation” to learn more.

More updates

Most Popular

Poverty Facts and Stats

Last updated Monday, January 07, 2013.

Most of humanity lives on just a few dollars a day. Whether you live in the wealthiest nations in the world or the poorest, you will see high levels of inequality.

The poorest people will also have less access to health, education and other services. Problems of hunger, malnutrition and disease afflict the poorest in society. The poorest are also typically marginalized from society and have little representation or voice in public and political debates, making it even harder to escape poverty.

By contrast, the wealthier you are, the more likely you are to benefit from economic or political policies. The amount the world spends on military, financial bailouts and other areas that benefit the wealthy, compared to the amount spent to address the daily crisis of poverty and related problems are often staggering.

Some facts and figures on poverty presented in this page are eye-openers, to say the least.

Read “Poverty Facts and Stats” to learn more.

Global Financial Crisis

Last updated Sunday, March 24, 2013.

Following a period of economic boom, a financial bubble — global in scope — burst, even causing some of the world’s largest financial institutions have collapsed. With the resulting recession, many governments of the wealthiest nations in the world have resorted to extensive bail-out and rescue packages for the remaining large banks and financial institutions while imposing harsh austerity measures on themselves.

Some of the bail-outs have also led to charges of hypocrisy due to the apparent socializing of the costs while privatizing the profits. Furthermore, the institutions being rescued are typically the ones got the world into this trouble in the first place. For smaller businesses and poorer people, such options for bail out and rescue are rarely available when they find themselves in crisis.

Plummeting stock markets at one point wiped out 33% of the value of companies, $14.5 trillion. Taxpayers bailed out their banks and financial institutions with large amounts of money. US taxpayers alone have spent some $9.7 trillion in bailout packages and plans. The UK and other European countries have also spent some $2 trillion on rescues and bailout packages. More is expected. Much more.

Such numbers, made quickly available, are enough to wipe many individual’s mortgages, or clear out third world debt many times over. Even the high military spending figures are dwarfed by the bailout plans to date.

Taxpayers are paying for some of the largests costs in history

This problem could have been averted (in theory) as people had been pointing to these issues for decades. However, during boom, very few want to hear such pessimism. Does this crisis spell an end to the careless forms of banking and finance and will it herald a better economic age, or are we just doomed to keep forgetting history and repeat these mistakes in the future? Signs are not encouraging as rich nations are resisting meaningful reform…

Read “Global Financial Crisis” to learn more.

Causes of Poverty

Last updated Sunday, September 28, 2014.

Poverty is the state for the majority of the world’s people and nations. Why is this? Is it enough to blame poor people for their own predicament? Have they been lazy, made poor decisions, and been solely responsible for their plight? What about their governments? Have they pursued policies that actually harm successful development? Such causes of poverty and inequality are no doubt real. But deeper and more global causes of poverty are often less discussed.

Read “Causes of Poverty” to learn more.

Climate Change and Global Warming

Last updated Monday, February 02, 2015.

The climate is changing. The earth is warming up, and there is now overwhelming scientific consensus that it is happening, and human-induced. With global warming on the increase and species and their habitats on the decrease, chances for ecosystems to adapt naturally are diminishing. Many are agreed that climate change may be one of the greatest threats facing the planet. Recent years show increasing temperatures in various regions, and/or increasing extremities in weather patterns.

This section explores some of the effects of climate change. It also attempts to provide insights into what governments, companies, international institutions, and other organizations are attempting to do about this issue, as well as the challenges they face. Some of the major conferences in recent years are also discussed.

Read “Climate Change and Global Warming” to learn more.

Environmental Issues

Last updated Monday, February 02, 2015.

Environmental issues are also a major global issue. Humans depend on a sustainable and healthy environment, and yet we have damaged the environment in numerous ways. This section introduces other issues including biodiversity, climate change, animal and nature conservation, population, genetically modified food, sustainable development, and more.

Read “Environmental Issues” to learn more.

Racism

Last updated Sunday, August 08, 2010.

Racism is the belief that characteristics and abilities can be attributed to people simply on the basis of their race and that some racial groups are superior to others. Racism and discrimination have been used as powerful weapons encouraging fear or hatred of others in times of conflict and war, and even during economic downturns. This article explores racism from around the world.

Read “Racism” to learn more.

More articles

Topical

Global Financial Crisis

Last updated Sunday, March 24, 2013.

Following a period of economic boom, a financial bubble — global in scope — burst, even causing some of the world’s largest financial institutions have collapsed. With the resulting recession, many governments of the wealthiest nations in the world have resorted to extensive bail-out and rescue packages for the remaining large banks and financial institutions while imposing harsh austerity measures on themselves.

Some of the bail-outs have also led to charges of hypocrisy due to the apparent socializing of the costs while privatizing the profits. Furthermore, the institutions being rescued are typically the ones got the world into this trouble in the first place. For smaller businesses and poorer people, such options for bail out and rescue are rarely available when they find themselves in crisis.

Plummeting stock markets at one point wiped out 33% of the value of companies, $14.5 trillion. Taxpayers bailed out their banks and financial institutions with large amounts of money. US taxpayers alone have spent some $9.7 trillion in bailout packages and plans. The UK and other European countries have also spent some $2 trillion on rescues and bailout packages. More is expected. Much more.

Such numbers, made quickly available, are enough to wipe many individual’s mortgages, or clear out third world debt many times over. Even the high military spending figures are dwarfed by the bailout plans to date.

Taxpayers are paying for some of the largests costs in history

This problem could have been averted (in theory) as people had been pointing to these issues for decades. However, during boom, very few want to hear such pessimism. Does this crisis spell an end to the careless forms of banking and finance and will it herald a better economic age, or are we just doomed to keep forgetting history and repeat these mistakes in the future? Signs are not encouraging as rich nations are resisting meaningful reform…

Read “Global Financial Crisis” to learn more.

Climate Change and Global Warming

Last updated Monday, February 02, 2015.

The climate is changing. The earth is warming up, and there is now overwhelming scientific consensus that it is happening, and human-induced. With global warming on the increase and species and their habitats on the decrease, chances for ecosystems to adapt naturally are diminishing. Many are agreed that climate change may be one of the greatest threats facing the planet. Recent years show increasing temperatures in various regions, and/or increasing extremities in weather patterns.

This section explores some of the effects of climate change. It also attempts to provide insights into what governments, companies, international institutions, and other organizations are attempting to do about this issue, as well as the challenges they face. Some of the major conferences in recent years are also discussed.

Read “Climate Change and Global Warming” to learn more.

Food and Agriculture Issues

Last updated Sunday, September 28, 2014.

Food and agriculture goes to the heart of our civilizations. Religions, cultures and even modern civilization have food and agriculture at their core. For an issue that goes to the heart of humanity it also has its ugly side.

This issue explores topics ranging from the global food crisis of 2008, to issues of food aid, world hunger, food dumping and wasteful agriculture such as growing tobacco, sugar, beef, and more.

Read “Food and Agriculture Issues” to learn more.

Foreign Aid for Development Assistance

Last updated Sunday, September 28, 2014.

In 1970, the world’s rich countries agreed to give 0.7% of their gross national income as official international development aid, annually.

Since that time, billions have certainly been given each year, but rarely have the rich nations actually met their promised target.

For example, the US is often the largest donor in dollar terms, but ranks amongst the lowest in terms of meeting the stated 0.7% target.

Net ODA in dollars and percent of GNI

Furthermore, aid has often come with a price of its own for the developing nations. Common criticisms, for many years, of foreign aid, have included the following:

  • Aid is often wasted on conditions that the recipient must use overpriced goods and services from donor countries
  • Most aid does not actually go to the poorest who would need it the most
  • Aid amounts are dwarfed by rich country protectionism that denies market access for poor country products while rich nations use aid as a lever to open poor country markets to their products
  • Large projects or massive grand strategies often fail to help the vulnerable; money can often be embezzled away.

This article explores who has benefited most from this aid, the recipients or the donors.

Read “Foreign Aid for Development Assistance” to learn more.

Tax Avoidance and Tax Havens; Undermining Democracy

Last updated Monday, January 07, 2013.

Through tax havens, transfer pricing and many other policies — both legal and illegal — billions of dollars of tax are avoided. The much-needed money would helped developing (and developed) countries provide important social services for their populations.

Some tax avoidance, regardless of how morally objectionable it may be to some people, is perfectly legal, and the global super elite are able to hide away trillions of dollars, resulting in massive losses of tax revenues for cash-strapped governments who then burden ordinary citizens further with austerity measures during economic crisis, for example. Yet these super elite are often very influential in politics and business. In effect, they are able to undermine democracy and capitalism at the same time.

As the global financial crisis has affected many countries, tackling tax avoidance would help target those more likely to have contributed to the problem while avoid many unnecessary austerity measures that hit the poorest so hard. But despite rhetoric stating otherwise, it does not seem to high on the agenda of many governments as you might think.

Read “Tax Avoidance and Tax Havens; Undermining Democracy” to learn more.

World Military Spending

Last updated Sunday, June 30, 2013.

World military spending had reduced since the Cold War ended, but a few nations such as the US retain high level spending.

In recent years, global military expenditure has increased again and is now comparable to Cold War levels. Recent data shows global spending at over $1.7 trillion. 2012 saw the first dip in spending — only slightly —since 1998, in an otherwise rising trend.

After a decline following the end of the Cold War, recent years have seen military spending increase

The highest military spender is the US accounting for almost two-fifths of the world’s spending, more than the rest of the G7 (most economically advanced countries) combined, and more than all its potential enemies, combined.

Read “World Military Spending” to learn more.

More issues

“If a man is offered a fact which goes against his instincts, he will scrutinize it closely, and unless the evidence is overwhelming, he will refuse to believe it. If, on the other hand, he is offered something which affords a reason for acting in accordance to his instincts, he will accept it even on the slightest evidence.” — Bertrand Russell, Roads to Freedom