Today, around 21,000 children died around the world. This daily tragedy, from poverty and other preventable causes, rarely makes headline news.

Latest World News

World

  1. “The Sustainable Bioeconomy, a Path Towards Post-Extractivism”

    Friday, July 20, 2018

    QUITO, Jul 20 (IPS) - Ela Zambrano interviews TARSICIO GRANIZO, Ecuador's minister of environmentEcuador has decided to move towards a bioeconomy-based development model, "which must be sustainable," because otherwise "the remedy could be worse than the disease," said the country's Environment Minister Tarsicio Granizo, who is spearheading this innovative approach.

  2. Support of Influential World Leaders Not Enough to End Rohingya Crisis

    Thursday, July 19, 2018

    DHAKA, Jul 19 (IPS) - Despite having the strong support of influential global leaders, Bangladesh has ‘missed' the opportunity to mobilise the world's superpowers and place pressure on Myanmar to allow for the repatriation of the Rohingya refugees.

  3. How Prison Conditions Fuel the Tuberculosis Epidemic

    Thursday, July 19, 2018

    WASHINGTON DC, Jul 19 (IPS) - David Bryden is the TB advocacy officer at RESULTS. He coordinates US advocacy, and co-chairs the TB RoundtableDozens of grown men peered from behind the barred doorway of a crammed window-less prison cell, eyes pleading desperately from sweaty faces. Their physical discomfort was so palpable, I could almost feel it. Because of my work, I also knew of at least one serious unseen risk facing them – that of contracting tuberculosis in the cramped, poorly ventilated space.

  4. India Fast Becoming a Pillar of Global Growth & Stability

    Thursday, July 19, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Jul 19 (IPS) - Hardeep S. Puri, India's Minister of State for Housing & Urban Affairs, in his address to the UN's High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development.

    It is with great pleasure and pride that I interact with you this afternoon as India's Minister of Housing and Urban Affairs, to share some thoughts on India's extremely ambitious, and arguably the world's largest planned urbanization programme under the leadership of our Prime Minister, Narendra Modi.

  5. The Industrialization of Cybercrime

    Wednesday, July 18, 2018

    WASHINGTON DC, Jul 18 (IPS) - Tamas Gaidosch, a senior financial sector expert in the IMF's Monetary and Capital Markets Department, is a cybersecurity professional with more than 20 years' experience, including probing banking systems to find cyber weaknesses. He formerly led the Information Technology Supervision Department at the Central Bank of Hungary.

    Cybercrime is now a mature industry operating on principles much like those of legitimate businesses in pursuit of profit. Combating the proliferation of cybercrime means disrupting a business model that employs easy-to-use tools to generate high profits with low risk.

  6. Social Media – the New Testing Ground for Sri Lanka’s Freedom

    Wednesday, July 18, 2018

    COLOMBO, Jul 18 (IPS) - Journalists and media activists have cautioned against Sri Lanka's newfound press freedom as the country heads to the polls in 2020. Separate incidents of hate-speech against a Muslim minority—and the subsequent shutdown of social media platforms—and the harassment of reporters critical of the country's opposition have led some to believe that the changes in media independence could reverse.

  7. Chile Has Medicine Against Desertification, But Does Not Take It

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018

    OVALLE, Chile, Jul 17 (IPS) - The retention of rainwater which otherwise is lost at sea could be an excellent medicine against the advance of the desert from northern to central Chile, but there is no political will to take the necessary actions, according to experts and representatives of affected communities.

  8. Immigration, Lot of Myths and Little Reality

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018

    ROME, Jul 17 (IPS) - According to the latest statistics, the total flow of immigrants so far in 2018 is 50.000 people, compared with 186,768 last year, 1,259,955 in 2016 and 1,327,825 in 2015. The difference between reality and perceptions is so astonishing, we are clearly witnessing one of the most brilliant manipulations in history.

  9. Q&A: Air Pollution Remains Cause for Alarm in Asia

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018

    BANGKOK, Jul 17 (IPS) - IPS correspondent Sinsiri Tiwutanond spoke to Global Green Growth Institute's director-general Dr. Frank Rijsbermanon about Asia's fight against air pollution.

    At the start of the year the pollution in Vietnam's capital, Hanoi, reached six times the World Health Organization's guideline levels for air quality.

    Yet the levels, which appear higher than those of South Korea's capital Seoul—where most people monitor the air pollution levels daily—is not treated with equal concern because of a lack of general awareness. This is despite the fact that air pollution has become the largest cause of premature deaths in Asia.

  10. New York, With 8.5 Million People, Among Cities Heading for a Sustainable Future

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Jul 17 (IPS) - Maimunah Mohd Sharif is Executive Director of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme and Achim Steiner is Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme.

    New York has long been considered a pioneer – in fashion, art, music, and food, just to name a few. Now this city of 8.5 million is leading a shift in how we tackle today's toughest global challenges like climate change, education, inequality, and poverty.

  11. More stories…

Economy

  1. “The Sustainable Bioeconomy, a Path Towards Post-Extractivism”

    Friday, July 20, 2018

    QUITO, Jul 20 (IPS) - Ela Zambrano interviews TARSICIO GRANIZO, Ecuador's minister of environmentEcuador has decided to move towards a bioeconomy-based development model, "which must be sustainable," because otherwise "the remedy could be worse than the disease," said the country's Environment Minister Tarsicio Granizo, who is spearheading this innovative approach.

  2. Q&A: Air Pollution Remains Cause for Alarm in Asia

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018

    BANGKOK, Jul 17 (IPS) - IPS correspondent Sinsiri Tiwutanond spoke to Global Green Growth Institute's director-general Dr. Frank Rijsbermanon about Asia's fight against air pollution.

    At the start of the year the pollution in Vietnam's capital, Hanoi, reached six times the World Health Organization's guideline levels for air quality.

    Yet the levels, which appear higher than those of South Korea's capital Seoul—where most people monitor the air pollution levels daily—is not treated with equal concern because of a lack of general awareness. This is despite the fact that air pollution has become the largest cause of premature deaths in Asia.

  3. Greening the Way for Thailand’s First Green and Smart City

    Monday, July 16, 2018

    BANGKOK, Jul 16 (IPS) - Thailand's industrial sector must focus on sustainable and green development to remain competitive in the region.

  4. Africa Could be Next Frontier for Cryptocurrency

    Monday, July 16, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Jul 16 (IPS) - Pavithra Rao, Africa Renewal.* Cryptocurrency is not bound by geography because it is internet based; its transactions are stored in a database called blockchain, which is a group of connected computers that record transactions in a ledger in real time.

  5. Will Trump’s Trade War Make America Great Again?

    Monday, July 16, 2018

    SYDNEY & KUALA LUMPUR, Jul 16 (IPS) - The United States has had the world's largest trade deficit for almost half a century. In 2017, the US trade deficit in goods and services was $566 billion; without services, the merchandise account deficit was $810 billion.

  6. Blue Economy Movement Gains Traction in Africa

    Monday, July 16, 2018

    NAIROBI, Jul 16 (IPS) - An increasing number of African countries are now embracing the blue economy for its potential to deliver solutions to their most pressing development needs–particularly extreme poverty and hunger.

  7. Agroecology Beats Land and Water Scarcity in Brazil

    Thursday, July 12, 2018

    ESPERANÇA/CUMARU, Brazil, Jul 12 (IPS) - "Now we live well," say both Givaldo and Nina dos Santos, after showing visiting farmers their 1.25-hectare farm in Brazil's semi-arid Northeast, which is small but has a great variety of fruit trees, thanks to innovative water and production techniques.

  8. Ocean Conservation Is an Untapped Strategy for Fighting Climate Change

    Friday, July 06, 2018

    WASHINGTON DC, Jul 06 (IPS) - Eliza Northrop is an Associate in the International Climate Action Initiative at World Resources Institute. The ocean contributes $1.5 trillion annually to the global economy and assures the livelihood of 10-12 percent of the world's population. But there's another reason to protect marine ecosystems—they're crucial for curbing climate change.

  9. War, High Tariffs and Nationalisation - their Cost to Africa’s Climate

    Thursday, July 05, 2018

    KINSHASA, Jul 05 (IPS) - Africa's political instability, its armed conflicts and regulatory issues are placing at risk investment needed to tackle climate change and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on the continent.

  10. New & Resurgent Infectious Diseases Can Have Far-reaching Economic Repercussions

    Tuesday, July 03, 2018

    WASHINGTON DC, Jul 03 (IPS) - DAVID E. BLOOM is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, DANIEL CADARETTE is a research assistant, and JP SEVILLA is a research associate, all at Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

    Infectious diseases and associated mortality have abated, but they remain a significant threat throughout the world.

    We continue to fight both old pathogens, such as the plague, that have troubled humanity for millennia and new pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), that have mutated or spilled over from animal reservoirs.

  11. More stories…

Climate

  1. “The Sustainable Bioeconomy, a Path Towards Post-Extractivism”

    Friday, July 20, 2018

    QUITO, Jul 20 (IPS) - Ela Zambrano interviews TARSICIO GRANIZO, Ecuador's minister of environmentEcuador has decided to move towards a bioeconomy-based development model, "which must be sustainable," because otherwise "the remedy could be worse than the disease," said the country's Environment Minister Tarsicio Granizo, who is spearheading this innovative approach.

  2. India Fast Becoming a Pillar of Global Growth & Stability

    Thursday, July 19, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Jul 19 (IPS) - Hardeep S. Puri, India's Minister of State for Housing & Urban Affairs, in his address to the UN's High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development.

    It is with great pleasure and pride that I interact with you this afternoon as India's Minister of Housing and Urban Affairs, to share some thoughts on India's extremely ambitious, and arguably the world's largest planned urbanization programme under the leadership of our Prime Minister, Narendra Modi.

  3. Chile Has Medicine Against Desertification, But Does Not Take It

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018

    OVALLE, Chile, Jul 17 (IPS) - The retention of rainwater which otherwise is lost at sea could be an excellent medicine against the advance of the desert from northern to central Chile, but there is no political will to take the necessary actions, according to experts and representatives of affected communities.

  4. Q&A: Air Pollution Remains Cause for Alarm in Asia

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018

    BANGKOK, Jul 17 (IPS) - IPS correspondent Sinsiri Tiwutanond spoke to Global Green Growth Institute's director-general Dr. Frank Rijsbermanon about Asia's fight against air pollution.

    At the start of the year the pollution in Vietnam's capital, Hanoi, reached six times the World Health Organization's guideline levels for air quality.

    Yet the levels, which appear higher than those of South Korea's capital Seoul—where most people monitor the air pollution levels daily—is not treated with equal concern because of a lack of general awareness. This is despite the fact that air pollution has become the largest cause of premature deaths in Asia.

  5. New York, With 8.5 Million People, Among Cities Heading for a Sustainable Future

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Jul 17 (IPS) - Maimunah Mohd Sharif is Executive Director of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme and Achim Steiner is Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme.

    New York has long been considered a pioneer – in fashion, art, music, and food, just to name a few. Now this city of 8.5 million is leading a shift in how we tackle today's toughest global challenges like climate change, education, inequality, and poverty.

  6. Greening the Way for Thailand’s First Green and Smart City

    Monday, July 16, 2018

    BANGKOK, Jul 16 (IPS) - Thailand's industrial sector must focus on sustainable and green development to remain competitive in the region.

  7. Despite Progress, South Asia Faces Daunting Challenges in Water & Sanitation

    Monday, July 16, 2018

    NEW DELHI, Jul 16 (IPS) - Vanita Suneja is Regional Advocacy Manager, South Asia, for WaterAid.

    In 2030, when I would be turning sixty, I'd like to tell my grandchildren the story of how — once upon a time — the lives of poor people in South Asia were transformed: that leaders came together to bring economic prosperity and social development to people that until then had lived in an unequal and polluted world.

  8. Blue Economy Movement Gains Traction in Africa

    Monday, July 16, 2018

    NAIROBI, Jul 16 (IPS) - An increasing number of African countries are now embracing the blue economy for its potential to deliver solutions to their most pressing development needs–particularly extreme poverty and hunger.

  9. Raising the Profile on the Largest Environmental Issue of Our Time

    Friday, July 13, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Jul 13 (IPS) - Land degradation caused by human activities is occurring at an alarming rate across the world, and the cost will be steep if no action is taken.

  10. Forests and Marine Resources Continue to Shrink

    Thursday, July 12, 2018

    ROME, Jul 12 (IPS) - Deforestation and unsustainable farming are depriving the planet of forests, while destructive practices in fishing are limiting the chance to sustainably manage our oceans.

  11. More stories…

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Issues In depth

Latest

Action on climate change is cheaper than inaction

Posted Monday, February 02, 2015.

Many are afraid that tackling climate change is going to be too costly. But increasingly, studies are showing action will not just be cheaper than inaction, but could actually result in economic, environmental and even health benefits, while improving sustainability.

Read “Action on climate change is cheaper than inaction” to learn more.

Climate Change and Global Warming Introduction

Last updated Sunday, February 01, 2015.

The climate is changing. The earth is warming up, and there is now overwhelming scientific consensus that it is happening, and human-induced. With global warming on the increase and species and their habitats on the decrease, chances for ecosystems to adapt naturally are diminishing.

Many are agreed that climate change may be one of the greatest threats facing the planet. Recent years show increasing temperatures in various regions, and/or increasing extremities in weather patterns.

This section looks at what causes climate change, what the impacts are and where scientific consensus currently is.

Read “Climate Change and Global Warming Introduction” to learn more.

COP20—Lima Climate Conference

Posted Saturday, January 24, 2015.

An overview of the Climate Change Conference (also known as COP 20), held in Lima, Peru in December 2014.

While it seemed like it was a successful meeting, because developing nations were committed to drawing up their own plans for emissions reductions for the first time, a number of important issues were left undecided such as how financing would work.

This page is an overview of the Lima Climate conference.

Read “COP20—Lima Climate Conference” to learn more.

Ebola Outbreak in West Africa

Posted Saturday, September 27, 2014.

An overview of the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa that has been described by the World Health Organization as the largest, most severe and most complex outbreak in the history of the disease.

The epidemic began at the end of 2013, in Guinea. From there it spread to Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Senegal. Many of the affected countries face enormous challenges in stopping its spread and providing care for all patients.

Thousands of people have died and many are at risk as the fatality rate from this virus is very high. As the crisis worsens, as well as the enormous health challenges involved, the social and economic consequences may set these countries back, reversing some gains a number of these countries have made in recent years.

Read “Ebola Outbreak in West Africa” to learn more.

Foreign Aid for Development Assistance

Last updated Sunday, September 28, 2014.

In 1970, the world’s rich countries agreed to give 0.7% of their gross national income as official international development aid, annually.

Since that time, billions have certainly been given each year, but rarely have the rich nations actually met their promised target.

For example, the US is often the largest donor in dollar terms, but ranks amongst the lowest in terms of meeting the stated 0.7% target.

Net ODA in dollars and percent of GNI

Furthermore, aid has often come with a price of its own for the developing nations. Common criticisms, for many years, of foreign aid, have included the following:

  • Aid is often wasted on conditions that the recipient must use overpriced goods and services from donor countries
  • Most aid does not actually go to the poorest who would need it the most
  • Aid amounts are dwarfed by rich country protectionism that denies market access for poor country products while rich nations use aid as a lever to open poor country markets to their products
  • Large projects or massive grand strategies often fail to help the vulnerable; money can often be embezzled away.

This article explores who has benefited most from this aid, the recipients or the donors.

Read “Foreign Aid for Development Assistance” to learn more.

Nature and Animal Conservation

Last updated Sunday, January 19, 2014.

Preserving species and their habitats is important for ecosystems to self-sustain themselves.

Yet, the pressures to destroy habitat for logging, illegal hunting, and other challenges are making conservation a struggle.

Read “Nature and Animal Conservation” to learn more.

More updates

Most Popular

Poverty Facts and Stats

Last updated Monday, January 07, 2013.

Most of humanity lives on just a few dollars a day. Whether you live in the wealthiest nations in the world or the poorest, you will see high levels of inequality.

The poorest people will also have less access to health, education and other services. Problems of hunger, malnutrition and disease afflict the poorest in society. The poorest are also typically marginalized from society and have little representation or voice in public and political debates, making it even harder to escape poverty.

By contrast, the wealthier you are, the more likely you are to benefit from economic or political policies. The amount the world spends on military, financial bailouts and other areas that benefit the wealthy, compared to the amount spent to address the daily crisis of poverty and related problems are often staggering.

Some facts and figures on poverty presented in this page are eye-openers, to say the least.

Read “Poverty Facts and Stats” to learn more.

Global Financial Crisis

Last updated Sunday, March 24, 2013.

Following a period of economic boom, a financial bubble — global in scope — burst, even causing some of the world’s largest financial institutions have collapsed. With the resulting recession, many governments of the wealthiest nations in the world have resorted to extensive bail-out and rescue packages for the remaining large banks and financial institutions while imposing harsh austerity measures on themselves.

Some of the bail-outs have also led to charges of hypocrisy due to the apparent socializing of the costs while privatizing the profits. Furthermore, the institutions being rescued are typically the ones got the world into this trouble in the first place. For smaller businesses and poorer people, such options for bail out and rescue are rarely available when they find themselves in crisis.

Plummeting stock markets at one point wiped out 33% of the value of companies, $14.5 trillion. Taxpayers bailed out their banks and financial institutions with large amounts of money. US taxpayers alone have spent some $9.7 trillion in bailout packages and plans. The UK and other European countries have also spent some $2 trillion on rescues and bailout packages. More is expected. Much more.

Such numbers, made quickly available, are enough to wipe many individual’s mortgages, or clear out third world debt many times over. Even the high military spending figures are dwarfed by the bailout plans to date.

Taxpayers are paying for some of the largests costs in history

This problem could have been averted (in theory) as people had been pointing to these issues for decades. However, during boom, very few want to hear such pessimism. Does this crisis spell an end to the careless forms of banking and finance and will it herald a better economic age, or are we just doomed to keep forgetting history and repeat these mistakes in the future? Signs are not encouraging as rich nations are resisting meaningful reform…

Read “Global Financial Crisis” to learn more.

Causes of Poverty

Last updated Sunday, September 28, 2014.

Poverty is the state for the majority of the world’s people and nations. Why is this? Is it enough to blame poor people for their own predicament? Have they been lazy, made poor decisions, and been solely responsible for their plight? What about their governments? Have they pursued policies that actually harm successful development? Such causes of poverty and inequality are no doubt real. But deeper and more global causes of poverty are often less discussed.

Read “Causes of Poverty” to learn more.

Climate Change and Global Warming

Last updated Monday, February 02, 2015.

The climate is changing. The earth is warming up, and there is now overwhelming scientific consensus that it is happening, and human-induced. With global warming on the increase and species and their habitats on the decrease, chances for ecosystems to adapt naturally are diminishing. Many are agreed that climate change may be one of the greatest threats facing the planet. Recent years show increasing temperatures in various regions, and/or increasing extremities in weather patterns.

This section explores some of the effects of climate change. It also attempts to provide insights into what governments, companies, international institutions, and other organizations are attempting to do about this issue, as well as the challenges they face. Some of the major conferences in recent years are also discussed.

Read “Climate Change and Global Warming” to learn more.

Environmental Issues

Last updated Monday, February 02, 2015.

Environmental issues are also a major global issue. Humans depend on a sustainable and healthy environment, and yet we have damaged the environment in numerous ways. This section introduces other issues including biodiversity, climate change, animal and nature conservation, population, genetically modified food, sustainable development, and more.

Read “Environmental Issues” to learn more.

Racism

Last updated Sunday, August 08, 2010.

Racism is the belief that characteristics and abilities can be attributed to people simply on the basis of their race and that some racial groups are superior to others. Racism and discrimination have been used as powerful weapons encouraging fear or hatred of others in times of conflict and war, and even during economic downturns. This article explores racism from around the world.

Read “Racism” to learn more.

More articles

Topical

Global Financial Crisis

Last updated Sunday, March 24, 2013.

Following a period of economic boom, a financial bubble — global in scope — burst, even causing some of the world’s largest financial institutions have collapsed. With the resulting recession, many governments of the wealthiest nations in the world have resorted to extensive bail-out and rescue packages for the remaining large banks and financial institutions while imposing harsh austerity measures on themselves.

Some of the bail-outs have also led to charges of hypocrisy due to the apparent socializing of the costs while privatizing the profits. Furthermore, the institutions being rescued are typically the ones got the world into this trouble in the first place. For smaller businesses and poorer people, such options for bail out and rescue are rarely available when they find themselves in crisis.

Plummeting stock markets at one point wiped out 33% of the value of companies, $14.5 trillion. Taxpayers bailed out their banks and financial institutions with large amounts of money. US taxpayers alone have spent some $9.7 trillion in bailout packages and plans. The UK and other European countries have also spent some $2 trillion on rescues and bailout packages. More is expected. Much more.

Such numbers, made quickly available, are enough to wipe many individual’s mortgages, or clear out third world debt many times over. Even the high military spending figures are dwarfed by the bailout plans to date.

Taxpayers are paying for some of the largests costs in history

This problem could have been averted (in theory) as people had been pointing to these issues for decades. However, during boom, very few want to hear such pessimism. Does this crisis spell an end to the careless forms of banking and finance and will it herald a better economic age, or are we just doomed to keep forgetting history and repeat these mistakes in the future? Signs are not encouraging as rich nations are resisting meaningful reform…

Read “Global Financial Crisis” to learn more.

Climate Change and Global Warming

Last updated Monday, February 02, 2015.

The climate is changing. The earth is warming up, and there is now overwhelming scientific consensus that it is happening, and human-induced. With global warming on the increase and species and their habitats on the decrease, chances for ecosystems to adapt naturally are diminishing. Many are agreed that climate change may be one of the greatest threats facing the planet. Recent years show increasing temperatures in various regions, and/or increasing extremities in weather patterns.

This section explores some of the effects of climate change. It also attempts to provide insights into what governments, companies, international institutions, and other organizations are attempting to do about this issue, as well as the challenges they face. Some of the major conferences in recent years are also discussed.

Read “Climate Change and Global Warming” to learn more.

Food and Agriculture Issues

Last updated Sunday, September 28, 2014.

Food and agriculture goes to the heart of our civilizations. Religions, cultures and even modern civilization have food and agriculture at their core. For an issue that goes to the heart of humanity it also has its ugly side.

This issue explores topics ranging from the global food crisis of 2008, to issues of food aid, world hunger, food dumping and wasteful agriculture such as growing tobacco, sugar, beef, and more.

Read “Food and Agriculture Issues” to learn more.

Foreign Aid for Development Assistance

Last updated Sunday, September 28, 2014.

In 1970, the world’s rich countries agreed to give 0.7% of their gross national income as official international development aid, annually.

Since that time, billions have certainly been given each year, but rarely have the rich nations actually met their promised target.

For example, the US is often the largest donor in dollar terms, but ranks amongst the lowest in terms of meeting the stated 0.7% target.

Net ODA in dollars and percent of GNI

Furthermore, aid has often come with a price of its own for the developing nations. Common criticisms, for many years, of foreign aid, have included the following:

  • Aid is often wasted on conditions that the recipient must use overpriced goods and services from donor countries
  • Most aid does not actually go to the poorest who would need it the most
  • Aid amounts are dwarfed by rich country protectionism that denies market access for poor country products while rich nations use aid as a lever to open poor country markets to their products
  • Large projects or massive grand strategies often fail to help the vulnerable; money can often be embezzled away.

This article explores who has benefited most from this aid, the recipients or the donors.

Read “Foreign Aid for Development Assistance” to learn more.

Tax Avoidance and Tax Havens; Undermining Democracy

Last updated Monday, January 07, 2013.

Through tax havens, transfer pricing and many other policies — both legal and illegal — billions of dollars of tax are avoided. The much-needed money would helped developing (and developed) countries provide important social services for their populations.

Some tax avoidance, regardless of how morally objectionable it may be to some people, is perfectly legal, and the global super elite are able to hide away trillions of dollars, resulting in massive losses of tax revenues for cash-strapped governments who then burden ordinary citizens further with austerity measures during economic crisis, for example. Yet these super elite are often very influential in politics and business. In effect, they are able to undermine democracy and capitalism at the same time.

As the global financial crisis has affected many countries, tackling tax avoidance would help target those more likely to have contributed to the problem while avoid many unnecessary austerity measures that hit the poorest so hard. But despite rhetoric stating otherwise, it does not seem to high on the agenda of many governments as you might think.

Read “Tax Avoidance and Tax Havens; Undermining Democracy” to learn more.

World Military Spending

Last updated Sunday, June 30, 2013.

World military spending had reduced since the Cold War ended, but a few nations such as the US retain high level spending.

In recent years, global military expenditure has increased again and is now comparable to Cold War levels. Recent data shows global spending at over $1.7 trillion. 2012 saw the first dip in spending — only slightly —since 1998, in an otherwise rising trend.

After a decline following the end of the Cold War, recent years have seen military spending increase

The highest military spender is the US accounting for almost two-fifths of the world’s spending, more than the rest of the G7 (most economically advanced countries) combined, and more than all its potential enemies, combined.

Read “World Military Spending” to learn more.

More issues

“If a man is offered a fact which goes against his instincts, he will scrutinize it closely, and unless the evidence is overwhelming, he will refuse to believe it. If, on the other hand, he is offered something which affords a reason for acting in accordance to his instincts, he will accept it even on the slightest evidence.” — Bertrand Russell, Roads to Freedom