News headlines for “Climate Change and Global Warming”, page 5

  1. Preservation of the Klamath River - a Life or Death Matter for the Yurok People

    Thursday, September 13, 2018

    KLAMATH, California, USA, Sep 13 (IPS) - Fishermen are scarce in the Klamath River delta, unlike other fishing season, because climate change has driven up water temperatures which kills off the salmon, the flagship species of this region in northern California.

  2. Global Warming Threatens Europe's Public Health

    Thursday, September 13, 2018

    VIENNA, Sep 13 (IPS) - Climate change and health experts are warning of the growing threat to public health in Europe from global warming as rising temperatures help potentially lethal diseases spread easily across the continent.

  3. Q&A: Achieving Sustainable Goals: “In the End it is All About People. If People Want, it Will Happen.”

    Wednesday, September 12, 2018

    STOCKHOLM, Sep 12 (IPS) - Manipadma Jena interviews the Deputy Director and Water Sector Lead at the Global Green Growth Institute's (GGGI) Investment and Policy Solutions Division, PETER VOS.Today just over two billion people live without readily available, safe water supplies at home. And more than half the world's population, roughly 4.3 billion people, live in areas where demand for water resources outstrips sustainable supplies for at least part of the year.

  4. “Running Out Of Time” - Local Communities Mobilise for the Climate

    Wednesday, September 12, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Sep 12 (IPS) - Local communities across the globe have risen up to demand commitments on climate change, as frustration mounts over the lack of action.

  5. Q&A: As Water Scarcity Becomes the New Normal How Do We Manage This Scarce Resource?

    Tuesday, September 11, 2018

    STOCKHOLM, Sep 11 (IPS) - Manipadma Jena interviews the executive director of the Stockholm International Water Institute, Torgyn Holmgren.

    Growing economies are thirsty economies. And water scarcity has become "the new normal" in many parts of the world, according to Torgyn Holmgren, executive director of the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI).

  6. Law of the Sea Convention Expands to Cover Marine Biological Diversity

    Tuesday, September 11, 2018

    COLOMBO, Sri Lanka, Sep 11 (IPS) - Dr Palitha Kohona is former Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Sri Lanka to the United Nations & former co-Chair of the UN Adhoc Working Group on Biological Diversity Beyond Areas of National Jurisdiction.

    Responding to a persistent demand by developing countries, the conservation community and science, the UN General Assembly has commenced a process for bringing the areas beyond national jurisdiction in the oceans under a global legally binding regulatory framework.

  7. Salmon Farming, Questioned in Chile, Arrives to Argentina

    Monday, September 10, 2018

    BUENOS AIRES, Sep 10 (IPS) - Questioned for its environmental and health impacts in Chile, where it is one of the country's main economic activities, salmon farming is preparing to expand in Argentina from Norway, the world's largest farmed salmon producer. The news has triggered a strong reaction from civil society organisations.

  8. Four-Year Drought Forces Cuba to Find Ways to Build Resilience

    Friday, September 07, 2018

    Eastern Cuba has suffered drought since time immemorial. But the western and central regions of the island used to be almost free of the phenomenon, until the latest drought that plagued this country between 2014 and 2017.

  9. UN Begins Talks on World’s First Treaty to Regulate High Seas

    Friday, September 07, 2018

    UNITED NATIONS, Sep 07 (IPS) - After several years of preliminary discussions, the United Nations has begun its first round of inter-governmental negotiations to draft the world's first legally binding treaty to protect and regulate the "high seas"—which, by definition, extend beyond 200 nautical miles (370 kilometers) and are considered "international waters" shared globally.

  10. Climate Change Becomes a Reality Check for the North

    Wednesday, September 05, 2018

    WAGENINGEN, The Netherlands, Sep 05 (IPS) - "This season, the month of May was particularly hot and dry," says Leo De Jong, a commercial farmer in Zeewolde, in Flevopolder, the Netherlands. Flevopolder is in the province of Flevoland, the largest site of land reclamation in the world. Here a hectare of land costs up to 100,000 Euros. "At the moment, we are spending between 20,000 and 25,000 Euros per week on irrigation."

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