News headlines for “Global Financial Crisis”, page 2

  1. Making African Continental Free Trade Area Work for Women in a Post-COVID-19 World

    Jan 06 (IPS) - Angela Lusigi is, UNDP Resident Representative in GhanaOn 1st January 2021, trading under the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) Agreement commenced after months of delays caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

  2. Stand Tall, UN Humanitarians

    LETHBRIDGE, Canada, Jan 05 (IPS) - Most people around the world were glad to see the back of 2020: From the devastating bushfires in Australia to the plagues of locusts through East Africa stretching across Arabia to Pakistan, extreme weather, melting ice sheets at the poles, and Covid-19 that still engulfs the globe.

  3. 2021: Year of Living Dangerously?

    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Jan 05 (IPS) - Goodbye 2020, but unfortunately, not good riddance, as we all have to live with its legacy. It has been a disastrous year for much of the world for various reasons, Elizabeth II’s annus horribilis. The crisis has exposed previously unacknowledged realities, including frailties and vulnerabilities.

  4. This Is Not a Goodbye, Kenya - Asante na Kwaheri ya Kuonana

    NAIROBI, Kenya, Jan 04 (IPS) - Happy New Year, Kenya.

    Several milestones in my personal and professional life have made Kenya a cherished place for me. I started my UNICEF career in Rumbek, South Sudan in June 2000, and my rest and recuperation breaks were in Nairobi. In fact Kenya was the first African country I had ever visited and, frankly, it was love at first sight.

  5. Reflecting Back and Imagining Forward

    SYDNEY, Dec 24 (IPS) - What a challenging year 2020 has been! A year of living dangerously – “Tahun vivere pericoloso”- perhaps these words of late President Soekarno of Indonesia are the best description.

    Fortunately, I managed to remain sane, reading and writing op-eds (mostly about the pandemic, herehere).

  6. 2020: A Yet More Devastating Year Closes With At Least Some Signs Of Hope

    ROME, Dec 23 (IPS) - Despite its grim record of multiple natural disasters and a deepening climate crisis, one could be forgiven for looking back on 2019 with a degree of nostalgia. There is no disguising the extent of the calamity wrought this year by COVID-19, yet as we approach the end of 2020 we may also draw strength from positive developments emerging.

  7. The World in 2021

    NEW YORK, Dec 22 (IPS) - The year 2020 is ending with the world caught up in an unprecedented human and economic crisis. The pandemic has contaminated 75 million people and killed 1.7 million. With the lockdowns, the global economy has suffered the worst recession in 75 years, causing the loss of income for millions of people. In such a bleak environment, what will the new year bring? Whilst uncertainty is the only certainty, eight points are likely to be key in the year ahead:

  8. Why Transforming Our Food Systems Is a Feminist Issue

    NAIROBI, Dec 22 (IPS) - In countries where women are most marginalized, discriminated under the law and where gendered norms prevent women from owning property and resources, people are also the hungriest. This is because gender equality and food systems are intertwined.

  9. The Impact of COVID-19 on Child Marriage and Other Gender-Based Violence

    DHAKA, Bangladesh, Dec 21 (IPS) - I recently visited rural areas of Bangladesh amid the COVID-19 pandemic and returned to Dhaka with a new understanding of the impact that COVID-19 is having on child marriage, a harmful practice that is a global challenge. The fundamental shift that I saw was that child marriage, which has typically been encouraged by struggling parents, is now being encouraged by struggling girls. This worrisome trend underscores a new burden of the pandemic on the poor.

  10. America has a Chequered Past in International Environmental Diplomacy

    THE HAGUE, Dec 17 (IPS) - When it comes to international environmental diplomacy, America has a chequered past. It stood at the forefront of the international battle to fix the ozone hole and has shaped many key international agreements.

    Sadly, US positions are not always built on solid political ground at home. Twice, in the climate change process, this has led to the United States forging an agreement, only to then walk away. This happened with the 1997 Kyoto Protocol which then Vice-President Gore flew to Japan to sign in the full knowledge that a Republican dominated Senate would never ratify the deal. It happened again five years ago, with former President Obama closing that landmark deal (and John Kerry signing at the UN), only for President Trump to tear it up a few weeks later.

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