COP17—Durban Climate Conference

Author and Page information

  • by Anup Shah
  • This Page Created Wednesday, January 04, 2012

Introduction

November 28 – December 9, 2011, Durban, South Africa was the venue for the 17th annual United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as the 17th Conference of the Parties — or COP 17.

Predictably and sadly, the same issues complained about at previous annual meetings for the past decade continue to recycle themselves:

  • Lack of quality (if any) media coverage
  • West stalling on doing anything trying to blame India and China instead
  • Lack of funding
  • Disagreement on how to address it
  • etc.

As the past two decades have shown trying to get global agreement on tackling climate change seems to be futile. By comparison, more focused and limited interest of elites, however, are easier to push through, such as wars based on geopolitical threats (real and imaginary), or economic crises (where banks and other elites most responsible for the crises are bailed out by ordinary citizens).

Furthermore, as the West has generally shown in the past decade or more (even when their economies were doing good) paying now for something that seems to be a problem in the future is hard to accept. It is easier, therefore, to stall and keep blaming China, India and other emerging nations despite the historical inequality of those emissions. But ignoring that makes it easier to hope these emerging nations will pick up the burden of addressing emissions rises.

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Media coverage

Generally speaking, media coverage of climate change issues and these conferences has been a mixed bag over the past decade. More recent years has seen increased interest and coverage (though many important issues are glossed over in mainstream media sound-byte style reporting).

However, by comparison, this year’s mainstream media coverage of this crucial conference was close to pathetic, to put it politely. In reality money speaks and so short term and elite/establishment views tend to prevail, which is why governments can so quickly get the “99%” to bail out the banks and the top 1% with many trillions of dollars, while finding billions for fighting even more devastating climate change has taken almost 2 decades so far without any convincing results.

Personally observing mainstream TV news in UK during the week of the Durban talks revealed almost no major headlines until the very last day and even then just a few moments of summarizing an entire two weeks, which of course is not enough. But my own observations were not systemmatic. However, media watchdog Media Lens confirmed my fears of poor coverage, not just in the UK but elsewhere such as the US:

Media interest in the subject has crashed. Dr. Robert J. Brulle of Drexel University describes a “collapse of any significant coverage of climate change in the [US] media. We know that 2010 was a record low year, and 2011 will probably look much the same. If the media doesn't draw attention to the issue, public opinion will decline.”

Equally disturbing is the variation in media performance across the globe. A wide-ranging Reuters study on the prevalence of climate skepticism in the world's media — Poles Apart — The international reporting of climate skepticism - focused on newspapers in Brazil, China, France, India, the UK and the USA. The periods studied were February to April 2007 and mid-November 2009 to mid-February 2010 (a period that included the UN climate change summit in Copenhagen and “Climategate”). Remarkably, the study concluded that climate skepticism is “predominantly an Anglo-Saxon phenomenon”, found most frequently in US and British newspapers.

And so we find that Britain and the US — the two countries responding most aggressively to alleged “threats” to human security in countries like Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya — are also the two countries least interested in responding to the very real threat of climate change.

Climate Crisis – The Collapse In Corporate Media Coverage , Media Lens, December 1, 2011

An additional concern that Media Lens also raises is what they described as “capitalism trampling on journalism”:

A prime example of this trampling was supplied by the high-profile BBC series Frozen Planet, narrated by David Attenborough, focusing on life and the environment in the Arctic and Antarctic. British viewers will see a total of seven episodes, the last of which, “On thin ice”, deals with the threat of climate change.

However, viewers in some other countries will only watch six episodes. This is because the BBC packaged the series in such a way that the climate change episode was an “optional extra” that foreign networks could choose to reject. And reject it they did — of 30 networks across the world that have bought the series, 10 have opted not to buy the episode on climate change. Most notable among them is the United States, the world’s leading contributor both to climate crisis and disinformation about the problem.

Climate Crisis – The Collapse In Corporate Media Coverage , Media Lens, December 1, 2011

In the United States, the annual Tyndall Report, which monitors the daily nightly newscasts of the three main TV outlets (ABC, CBS, and NBC) found just 4 stories on climate change for the entire 2011 on the 3 prime time news shows, two of them being just over 2 minutes each (the other two I cannot access from abroad).

The specific shows monitored are of course not the only news shown in the evenings, and other outlets like CNN are not included, and nor is the Internet, but 2/3rds of people get their news from TV in the US, as Jim Lobe noted in a news story covering this year’s Tyndall report. In that story, Andrew Tyndall, was interviewed by Jim Lobe who also added:

It is safe to say that the network news is complicit in this country’s [the USA] global warming denialism, reinforcing the problem, as opposed to reporting on it.

Andrew Tyndall interviewed by Jim Lobe, “Arab Spring” Dominated TV Foreign News in 2011, Inter Press Service, January 2, 2012

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Despite media’s lack of interest, emissions continue to rise

And while it seems unimportant to the mainstream media, nature continues its course:

While public concern grows and media coverage collapses, the climate change problem is going through the roof. According to a recent study by the US Department of Energy, the global output of heat-trapping carbon dioxide jumped by the biggest amount on record in 2010. The world pumped about 564 million more tons of carbon into the air in 2010 than it did in 2009, an increase of 6 per cent. The latest figures mean that levels of greenhouse gases “are higher than the worst case scenario outlined by climate experts just four years ago”, USA Today reports.

In the US alone, approximately $3.5 bn is invested annually in lobbying activities at the federal level. In recent years, Royal Dutch Shell, the US Chamber of Commerce, Edison Electric Institute, PG&E, Southern Company, ExxonMobil, Chevron, BP and ConocoPhillips all made the top 20 list of lobbyists. The climate campaign organisation 350.org estimates that 94 per cent of US Chamber of Commerce contributions went to climate denier candidates.

Climate Crisis – The Collapse In Corporate Media Coverage , Media Lens, December 1, 2011

And these are rises of carbon emissions even during the tough economic conditions.

Media Lens and USA Today are referring to the global carbon project report.

That report adds that although China, USA, India, and Russia accounted for the largest emissions growth in 2010, “Per capita emissions of developed countries remain several times larger than those of developing countries.”

In other words, significant — and fairer — gains can be obtained if rich nations would tackle their emissions (as has repeatedly been pointed out for some 2 decades).

Reuters summarized the above report and also added that a separate study published recently “concluded there was almost no chance of limiting warming to 2 degrees Celsius based on huge investments in polluting power stations.”

The summary of that report from the journal, Nature Climate Change, worries: “How nations intend to keep within a 2 °C threshold, let alone consider at [sic] 1.5 °C threshold, is unclear in light of current progress” (or lack of).

Despite Europe being on target to meet its Kyoto commitments, global carbon dioxide emissions are still on the increase having spiked by 45% since 1990 to reach a record level of 33 billion tonnes last year.

… to stay below 2 °C throughout this century, annual emissions will have to come down by about 4 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent from the present day level to about 44 Gt of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2020. Even then, there is just a 66% probability of staying within the 2 °C threshold by 2100. Out of the nearly 200 scenarios studied, only three give a 90% probability of staying below 2 °C this century, and all of those rely on commercially unproven technologies to capture and store carbon-based greenhouse gases. Even with the use of these technologies, there is at best a 50% probability of staying below 1.5 °C this century. Worryingly, if we wait until 2030 for emissions to peak, we're more likely to be looking to avoid 3 °C this century than 2 °C. In short, the 2 °C threshold is steadily slipping of reach, and 1.5 °C already seems unachievable.

Crossing the threshold, Nature Climate Change, October 27, 2011, doi:10.1038/nclimate1288

Keeping the average temperature increase within 2 °C of pre-industrial levels implies a target of 450 parts per million (ppm) C02 in the atmosphere. But 450ppm is already feared as not a safe target, but the only practical one to aim for now because of lack of progress amongst industrialized nations in the past 2 decades. And what if we get to 451 ppm?

How much will the world change if we increase CO2 levels to 451 ppm? Time will tell, but one way or the other we may be duplicating in strength in just 200 years what nature itself requires 10,000 years to do. We are applying that forcing beyond the point at which nature has always stopped.

We are duplicating within that short time period the greatest single force on this planet that nature alone has wielded for the past 2.5 million years. But nature does so slowly, carefully and predictably.

We are doing so rapidly, erratically, and without awareness or understanding of the consequences, or even taking long enough to recognize that what we are doing does indeed have an irreversible effect.

Sphaerica, (Fahrenheit) 451 ppm, Skeptical Science, December 11, 2011

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Common but Differentiated Responsibility Principle Sidelined Again

As Inter Press Service (IPS) summarized:

What is abundantly clear is the enormous divide between the rich and poor countries. Poor countries want deep cuts in emissions by the industrialized world, and the latter continue to resist significant cuts and legally binding targets.

Stephen Leahy, Climate Change: History Was Not Made, Inter Press Service, December 19, 2009

This site’s section on climate justice has long gone into some detail about

  • How the “Common but Differentiated Responsibility” acknowledges that rich nations have emitted most of the greenhouse gases that are causing climate change, that developing countries’ emissions are likely to rise on their path to industrialization and trying to meet basic social and development needs; and that therefore while the goals are the same, the means to tackle climate change will be different.
  • Year after year at climate summits, it seems this principle is often ignored by some rich nations and their media.
  • It has therefore been easier in public to blame nations like China and India for reacting negatively and being uncooperative when faced with pressure to submit to emission reduction targets (before many rich nations demonstrate they can do the same).

Greenhouse gases tend to remain in the atmosphere for many decades so historical emissions are an important consideration.

The following shows that the rich nations (known as “Annex I countries” in UN climate change speak) have historically emitted more than the rest of the world combined, even though China, India and others have been growing recently. This is why the “common but differentiated responsibilities” principle was recognized.

(Chart updated in January 2012 to add data up to 2008 and preliminary estimates for 2009 and 2010)

Source: Boden, T.A., G. Marland, and R.J. Andres, Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2011, DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/00001_V2011. 2009 and 2010 estimates also from CDIAC, by Tom Boden and T.J. Blasing

No doubt, developing nations should be aware of their recent rise and also do more to curb their emissions. But given their later entry to industrialization and that their per capita emissions are even less than rich nations, more emission reduction could also be achieved per person in rich nations.

Source: Boden, T.A., G. Marland, and R.J. Andres, Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2011, DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/00001_V2011. 2009 and 2010 estimates also from CDIAC, by Tom Boden and T.J. Blasing

The US and others have characterized the campaign for climate justice and equality to the atmosphere as a way to claim climate “reparations”; that it is unfair to make the industrialized nations pay for climate emissions into the past century or more at a time when they didn’t know it would cause more harm.

That seems reasonable. However, one of the implications is that any agreement that is subsequently drawn up will, in effect, put disproportionately more burden on the poorer countries to tackle a problem they did not largely cause. The poor are less likely to have the resources to do so, which also means that tackling climate change is less likely to be successful.

This is why rich nations are being asked to seriously think about the type and way they use energy in addition to helping the poorer nations (not necessarily “reparations” but through meaningful technology and adaptation assistance — which would be far less costly than the bailouts readily handed to people that did cause a major problem).

In addition, there is little fairness in asking China, India and others to be subject to emission targets when many rich countries didn’t achieve the watered down Kyoto targets themselves.

Some emerging nations are in a grey area — India, China, Brazil, etc are rapidly developing and although they have enormous social and development problems outstanding, some of their wealthy are as wealthy (some more so) as those in industrialized nations. As such, wealthier developing nations aren’t necessarily the target (nor asking) for such adaptation funds.

It is certainly more complex than a few sentences on this page can provide, but the simplification offered by rich country leaders and their media hides this complexity year after year. (See climate justice from this web site for more details on this.)

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Durban meeting outcome

The meeting in Durban seemed quite intense; some such as the US and EU were keen on getting China, India and other large emerging nations to sign on to binding emission reduction agreements. These countries were understandably reluctant and even if they may be gaining a stronger voice in the wake of the global/Western financial crisis, this meeting also showed that they haven’t eclipsed the West (at least not yet) on the diplomatic front.

Stephen Leahy, writing for IPS, provides a useful summary of the Durban meeting:

The world is increasingly committed to dangerous levels of global warming with yet another failure by nations of the world to agree to needed reductions in carbon emissions here in Durban.

After two weeks and an additional 29 hours of intense and even bitter negotiations, the 193 nations participating in the United Nations climate talks agreed to a complex and technical set of documents called the “Durban Platform.” These include the continuation of the Kyoto Protocol, a formal structure for a Green Climate Fund, new market mechanisms, and more.

Currently the promised emission reductions by industrialised countries and those of China, Brazil, South Africa, India and others under the 2009 Copenhagen Accord guarantee a world that is at least 3.5 degrees Celsius warmer on average according to climate science. It will be double that over large parts of the world. Some analysis says this global average could be even higher rising to four or five degrees Celsius threatening our species with annihilation.

Stephen Leahy, Agreement for New Global Treaty To Reduce Emissions, Inter Press Service, December 12, 2011

Interestingly, the level of reduction promised by the industrialized world is small compared to its portion of emissions. And it looks as though developing countries have lost out in many ways:

Despite the political posturing by the United States, Canada and even the European Union, the fact is that developing countries’ promised reductions are greater than the industrialised world that are responsible for 75 percent of the total human emissions in the atmosphere.

Waiting until 2020 to make major cuts means those cuts will have to be far deeper and far more costly to have any hope of keeping temperatures below two degrees Celsius,

The “Durban Platform” includes a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol that will begin January 2013, avoiding a gap at the end of the first commitment period finishing next year. The length of the second commitment period is to be decided at COP 18 in Qatar.

Developing countries insisted on this condition because Kyoto is the only legally binding emissions reduction agreement. However, it only asked for small reductions from industrialised countries like those in Europe, Canada, Australia, Japan and a few others. The U.S. opted out and Canada ignored its obligations and increased emissions 24 percent. And now Canada, Japan and Russia have said they will take not take part in the second commitment period.

Stephen Leahy, Agreement for New Global Treaty To Reduce Emissions, Inter Press Service, December 12, 2011

But it is not just developing countries that have lost out; the majority of the first world will have lost out too. Because, as Stephen Leahy rightly notes, trillions are easily and quickly made available to bail out the elite in a financial crises. But when it comes to an even bigger crisis that is further away (and admittedly harder, perhaps, to internalize), funds suddenly seem hard to find; governments are suddenly cash-strapped.

Private sources explicitly include carbon markets as governments from the rich countries frequently cited the financial crisis has tied their purse strings. Civil society and some developing nations noted that governments have made trillions of dollars available for the bank and financial sector and that world’s military budget is more than 10 times what is needed for the GFC [Green Climate Fund].

Stephen Leahy, Agreement for New Global Treaty To Reduce Emissions, Inter Press Service, December 12, 2011

See also George Monbiot’s note on this, comparing the $7 trillion in US bailout for their own banks, while an estimate for capping climate change globally would require less than a 10th of that: $650 billion. And contrast how quickly the trillions were made available versus how challenging it is for a climate fund to come about.

The other important issue for developing countries is that any climate fund be independent of Western control, somehow, because of the bad experience most poor countries have had in the past.

There was quite a lot of outcry at the stance of the US. Democracy Now! for example reported on the “Startling Level of Obstructionism and Defeatism” by the Obama Administration on a U.N. Climate Deal, opting for non-legally binding agreements.

Others, such as the EU, wanted a new legally binding agreement, but as the Third World Network, based in Malaysia, asked, What is the point of a new treaty? In Bali, 2007, the mechanisms were already agreed:

The reality is that the Climate Convention and the Kyoto Protocol that make up the existing legally binding climate architecture desperately need implementing, not replacing. Developed countries appear “progressive” by asking for a legally binding treaty or the mandate for one, when the real truth is that they are violating the current legally binding regime, shifting he goalpost agreed in the Bali Roadmap, and reneging on agreements for a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol.

Building on the Bali Mandate PDF formatted document, Third World Network, December 2011

This double-standard (in many areas, not just environment) is a major reason many protests have erupted throughout the industrialized world. The elite seem so far removed from the effects of climate change that perhaps there is no incentive for them to do things about it, effectively, unlike during the recent financial crisis. Instead, resigning to a high level of warming is perhaps acceptable to the elite as they will be better equipped to deal with it.

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More information

For more about the issues from other organizations, here are some starting points:

News stories from IPS

Below is a list of stories from Inter Press Service related to the Durban climate conference and its aftermath.

A Game-Changing Week on Climate Change

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

WASHINGTON, Nov 19 (IPS) - - In recent days, two major developments have injected new life into international action on climate change.

Why Are G20 Governments Subsidising Dangerous Climate Change?

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

LONDON, Nov 11 (IPS) - Just a week after the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) gave its starkest warning yet that the vast majority of existing oil, gas and coal reserves need to be kept in the ground, a new report reveals that governments are flagrantly ignoring these warnings and continuing to subsidise exploration for fossil fuels.

Trapped Populations – Hostages of Climate Change

Monday, November 10, 2014

LONDON, Nov 10 (IPS) - Climate change is projected by many scientists to bring with it a range of calamities – from widespread floods, to prolonged heatwaves and slowly but relentlessly rising seas – taking the heaviest toll on those already most vulnerable.

Responding to Climate Change from the Grassroots Up

Friday, November 07, 2014

GUNTHORPES, Antigua, Nov 07 (IPS) - As concern mounts over food security, two community groups are on a drive to mobilise average people across Antigua and Barbuda to mitigate and adapt in the wake of global climate change, which is affecting local weather patterns and by extension, agricultural production.

OPINION: The Front Line of Climate Change is Here and Now

Saturday, October 25, 2014

TUVALU, Oct 25 (IPS) - The fate of my country rests in your hands: that was the message which Ian Fry, representing Tuvalu gave at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen five years ago. This is also the message that the Pacific Climate Warriors have come to Australia to bring.

Ethiopia Moves in Right Direction with Climate Change Response But Challenges Remain

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

ADDIS ABABA, Oct 21 (IPS) - Ethiopia is widely regarded as an African success story when it comes to economic growth. According to the International Monetary Fund, the country's economy is growing by seven percent annually. But there are concerns that climate change could jeopardise this growth.

Pacific Climate Change Warriors Block World’s Largest Coal Port

Saturday, October 18, 2014

UNITED NATIONS, Oct 18 (IPS) - Climate Change Warriors from 12 Pacific Island nations paddled canoes into the world's largest coal port in Newcastle, Australia, Friday to bring attention to their grave fears about the consequences of climate change on their home countries.

Biodiversity, Climate Change Solutions Inextricably Linked

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

PYEONGCHANG, Republic of Korea, Oct 14 (IPS) - The remarkable biodiversity of the countries of the Caribbean, already under stress from human impacts like land use, pollution, invasive species, and over-harvesting of commercially valuable species, now faces an additional threat from climate change.

Climate Change an 'Existential Threat' for the Caribbean

Monday, September 22, 2014

KINGSTOWN, St. Vincent, Sep 22 (IPS) - When it comes to climate change, Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves doesn't mince words: he will tell you that it is a matter of life and death for Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

Pushing for Cities to Take Lead on Climate Change

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

PARIS, Sep 17 (IPS) - If former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg had used the Vélib' - Paris' public bicycle sharing system - to arrive at the headquarters of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development here Wednesday, he might have sent a stronger message about the need for cities to be "empowered to take the lead in combating climate change".

Tackling Climate Change and Promoting Development: A “Win-Win”

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

UNITED NATIONS, Sep 17 (IPS) - A widespread perception exists that developing countries must make a choice between tackling climate change and fighting poverty. This assumption is incorrect, according to the authors of a new report on green growth.

Will Climate Change Lead to Conflict or Cooperation?

Monday, August 04, 2014

UNITED NATIONS, Aug 04 (IPS) - The headline of every article about the relationship between climate change and conflict should be "It's complicated," according to Clionadh Raleigh.

Forest Rights Offer Major Opportunity to Counter Climate Change

Thursday, July 24, 2014

WASHINGTON, Jul 24 (IPS) - The international community is failing to take advantage of a potent opportunity to counter climate change by strengthening local land tenure rights and laws worldwide, new data suggests.

For the Caribbean, a United Front Is Key to Weathering Climate Change

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

PHILIPSBURG, St. Maarten, Jul 02 (IPS) - As the costs of climate change continue to mount, officials with the Commonwealth grouping say it is vital that Small Island Developing States (SIDS) stick together on issues such as per capita income classification.

Siberian Global Warming Meets Lukewarm Reaction in Russia

Saturday, June 21, 2014

MOSCOW, Jun 21 (IPS) - People in Siberia must prepare to face frequent repeats of recent devastating floods as well as other natural disasters, scientists and ecologists are warning, amid growing evidence of the effects of global warming on one of the world's most ecologically diverse regions.

Op-Ed: Overcoming the Twin Hurdles of Inequality and Climate Change

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

NEW YORK, Jun 17 (IPS) - Two major injustices – inequality and climate change – are threatening to undermine the efforts of millions of people to escape poverty and hunger.

Q&A: Developing World Leads in Advancement of Climate Change Laws

Sunday, June 08, 2014

MEXICO CITY, Jun 08 (IPS) - Developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America are increasingly leading the way in providing a legal framework for climate security and are being hailed for their continued advancement in formulating climate change laws and policies.

OP-ED: Climate Change Threatens the Wild Beauty of Small Islands

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

BONN, Jun 03 (IPS) - It's beginning to sink in that our climate is changing more rapidly than at any time in recorded history and it will have profound and irreversible effects on the planet. On World Environment Day on Jun. 5, let's stop for a moment to consider in particular the devastating impact that climate change is having on small island states and their wildlife. 

Mexico Underlines Transformation in Global Climate Change Debate

Monday, June 02, 2014

, Jun 02 (IPS) - It is now two years since Mexico passed the General Law on Climate Change, a landmark piece of national environmental legislation.

Climate Change Legislation Faltering in Costa Rica

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

SAN JOSE, May 21 (IPS) - Eight months after it was introduced in the Costa Rican legislature, a bill to create a framework law on climate change is faltering after undergoing modifications that have run into criticism from environmentalists and experts – a situation made even more complex by the recent change of government.

Caribbean Forced to Choose Between Climate Change Impact and MDGs

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

ST. JOHN’S, Antigua, May 21 (IPS) - Climate change is forcing the nine-member Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) to choose between expending scarce resources to deal with its impact or other pressing development goals.

Caribbean Fears Loss of 'Keystone Species' to Climate Change

Saturday, April 26, 2014

CODRINGTON, Barbuda, Apr 26 (IPS) - A marine biologist has cautioned that the mass deaths of starfish along the United States west coast in recent months could also occur in the Caribbean region because of climate change, threatening the vital fishing sector.

Mexico’s Climate Change Law - More Than Just Empty Words?

Monday, April 21, 2014

MEXICO CITY, Apr 21 (IPS) - When Mexico's climate change law went into effect in October 2012, it drew international praise. But what has happened since then?

OP-ED: Climate Change May Affect Your Travel Plans – and Those of Millions of Animals

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

SAN JOSÉ, Apr 09 (IPS) - There are few experiences more frustrating than a delay in travel plans caused by bad weather. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), this may be something we will have to get used to in the future.

Rural Costa Rican Women Plant Trees to Fight Climate Change

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

PITAL, Costa Rica, Apr 02 (IPS) - Olga Vargas, a breast cancer survivor, is back in the countryside, working in a forestry programme in the north of Costa Rica aimed at empowering women while at the same time mitigating the effects of climate change.

Indoor Mini-Farms to Beat Climate Change

Thursday, February 27, 2014

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad, Feb 27 (IPS) - Industrial engineer Ancel Bhagwandeen thinks that growing your food indoors is a great way to protect crops from the stresses of climate change. So he developed a hydroponic system that "leverages the nanoclimates in houses so that the house effectively protects the produce the same way it protects us," he says.

Kenya’s Excess of Policies Can’t Deal With Climate Change

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

NAIROBI, Dic 31 (IPS) - Kenyais facing its greatest challenge as weather patterns are starting to significantly affect food production. And experts are blaming the low adaptive capacity of the farming sector on an excess of policy and institutional frameworks that are silent on both climate change and agriculture.

Developing Countries Still Waiting for a Global Response to Climate Change

Thursday, December 12, 2013

BRUSSELS, Dic 12 (IPS) - As president of the Council of Ministers of the African, Caribbean and Pacific states, Samoa's Prime Minister Tuilaepa Lupesoliai Sailele Malielegaoi had the perfect forum to voice his concerns about the effects climate change has had on his island nation.

Preserving Life in Cuba for When the Climate Changes

Thursday, December 05, 2013

HAVANA, Dic 05 (IPS) - Nature reserves act as a safe deposit box for biodiversity and contribute to adaptation to climate change. But in a country like Cuba, plagued by a chronic economic crisis, efforts to increase the number of protected areas go largely unnoticed.

Climate Change Report “Gives No Reason for Optimism”

Saturday, September 28, 2013

RIO DE JANEIRO, Sep 28 (IPS) - Amidst rumours that global warming has slowed over the past 15 years, the new report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states that each of the last three decades has been warmer than any preceding decade since 1850.

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  • by Anup Shah
  • Created: Wednesday, January 04, 2012

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