Overview of Changes to Legal Rights

The following article from The Associated Press, appeared on Newsday.com and has been reposted here. It is a brief article giving an overview to some of the changes to legal rights in the U.S. in relation to the war on terror. This article can be found at its original location, http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-sept-11-legal-rights-glance0905sep05.story.

Overview of Changes to Legal Rights
The Associated Press
September 5, 2002

Some of the fundamental changes to Americans' legal rights by the Bush administration and the USA Patriot Act following the terror attacks:

* FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION: Government may monitor religious and political institutions without suspecting criminal activity to assist terror investigation.

* FREEDOM OF INFORMATION: Government has closed once-public immigration hearings, has secretly detained hundreds of people without charges, and has encouraged bureaucrats to resist public records requests.

* FREEDOM OF SPEECH: Government may prosecute librarians or keepers of any other records if they tell anyone that the government subpoenaed information related to a terror investigation.

* RIGHT TO LEGAL REPRESENTATION: Government may monitor federal prison jailhouse conversations between attorneys and clients, and deny lawyers to Americans accused of crimes.

* FREEDOM FROM UNREASONABLE SEARCHES: Government may search and seize Americans' papers and effects without probable cause to assist terror investigation.

* RIGHT TO A SPEEDY AND PUBLIC TRIAL: Government may jail Americans indefinitely without a trial.

* RIGHT TO LIBERTY: Americans may be jailed without being charged or being able to confront witnesses against them.

Copyright (c) 2002, The Associated Press

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  • Posted: Monday, September 09, 2002

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