Washington’s Eye on the Internet

The following is taken from the popular technology news web site CNET News.com. It provides a number of articles that look at issues related to the politics of the internet and the policies resulting as part of the effort on the war against terrorism. You can see the original article at http://news.com.com/2009-1023-966903.html?part=dht&tag=ntop. (Be sure to check the CNET link for more stories as they update and add content. Reposted here is just what was seen on November 22, 2002.)

Washington's eye on the Internet
CNET News.com Staff
22 November 2002
CNET News.com

A Defense Department agency mulls and then abandons a plan to curtail Net anonymity, but with the Homeland Security bill and the ruling of a secret court, the feds gain ground on online monitoring.

Pentagon drops plan to curb Net anonymity

A system mulled by a Defense Department agency would have sharply curtailed online anonymity by tagging e-mail and Web browsing with unique markers for each Internet user.
November 22, 2002

Homeland Security's tech effects

update: The Senate's overwhelming vote for a Homeland Security Department clears the way for massive reorganization of the federal government that will have a dramatic effect on computer and network security.
November 20, 2002

Secret U.S. court OKs electronic spying

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court of Review removes barriers for federal agents who conduct snooping online and elsewhere against suspected terrorists and spies.
November 18, 2002

Say hello to Big Brother

perspective: Like it or not, the proposed Department of Homeland Security firmly establishes a central role for the feds in computer and network security.
November 18, 2002

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  • Posted: Saturday, November 23, 2002

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